Gnomes on a Clipboard. Why not?

I am a teeny bit obsessed with gnomes. It started last Christmas. I made quite a few of them. They sold really well.

So, of course, I couldn’t help myself. I have gnome fever again this year. I decided to change up the look a little.

Here are a few more gnomes I’ve made …. so far.

Refrigerator magnet
Bean bag type gnome
Paint brush gnome – just had to do this! Lol

My latest project is the reason for this post. I purchased the image of the 3 gnomes from the Silhouette Design Store with a commercial license. I knew I would be using them quite a bit, they are so darn cute.

So last night, I cut a larger stencil from contact paper with my Silhouette machine. I used it, a chalk paste mesh stencil of snowflakes, and my own DIY chalk paste to create this cute design on a clipboard from Dollar Tree I had painted with chalkboard paint.

I could have wiped it off with a damp cloth and used the clipboard again, but it turned out so cute, I sealed it with an acrylic clear coat and made it permanent.

It can now be used as decor or as a clipboard …. or both!

Beautiful Lanterns from Light Covers from the 80s

Remember these? I love the beveled glass panels!

Our neighbors gifted these to us along with the fan/light fixture, another fan, and the fan blades for both. You’ll have to check out what I did with some of the fan blades already!

I have made two lanterns so far.

The first one I decorated for Christmas. I wanted a top for it and found a bell ornament that worked perfectly. I painted the light cover to match the bell. I used a candle plate with faux snow glued to it. I “planted” 3 trees to represent a Christmas tree farm and added a little red truck ornament and a tea light with a 6 hour timer.

Once the lantern was in place, I added the red berry garland.

I went Shabby Chic with the second one. I was stumped on how to make a lid for this one. But then I noticed one of my cans of spray sealer would work if I cut it down. I did that and painted it inside and out with our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company in Vintage Linen and added a prism cut drawer pull.

I glued the lid to the top of the cover with hot glue and E6000 and used metallic aged brass wax to distress.

I also painted a small mirror, distressed it with sandpaper and added a touch of the metallic aged brass wax.

The lantern sits over a hydrangea bloom I dried and a tea light with a 6 hour timer.

Very elegant!

Now, to think up another lantern or two or three to make. 😁

Halloween Deck Display “Tree”

Today is September 30th and it is a beautiful Fall day in Missouri ….. the perfect day to make a Halloween decoration for my Halloween Deck Display “Tree”. See my summer garden and fall displays below.

I used our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint (colors: Crisp Kale, Coal Shovel, January, and Harvest Pumpkin) and Sharpie oil paint pens. I had to have an inspiration piece to look at or I wouldn’t have been able to draw the faces. This is the inspiration photo I saw that was posted by https://www.facebook.com/ReScapedotcom/ I found the artist and they are for sale on Etsy for $74.95. https://pin.it/7DjaZfV

I used the photo above to help guide me when drawing the faces on mine below. FYI – if I can do this anyone can. We sell our paint in 2 oz ($3.99) containers that are perfect for projects like this as well as other sizes. Message me if interested in a porch pickup of paint. We can also ship.

Here’s my version of these cute and easy to make blocks.

And now here is my Halloween Deck Display “Tree”.

I used a silver tray and glued to a base. The painted and distressed it and the candelabra. The skeleton head are from Dollar Tree.
4×4 blocks are 15”, 10”x and 6” tall.
Dollar Tree idea I saw.
This pumpkin’s face is a vinyl cut out.
It didn’t take long to turn off the motion detector sounds on these Dollar Tree finds.
Fall Display
Summer Deck Garden

A Fall Dollar Tree Door Mat

I’ve been seeing the Dollar Tree Felt Pumpkins, Leaves, and Acorns used as stencils on the Dollar Tree gray door mats. This morning, I used the leaf one to create this beautiful door mat. You can do it, too!

Yes, I made that cute little fall gnome door hanger, too.

These are the materials I used. I used our paint brand we own and produce, Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint: Grannies Lace, Old Tin Barn, Bordeaux, English Ivy, and Possum Grape Jam. However, any brand and type of paint should do fine.

I used the side that was more ribbed. On my next one I will use the flatter side. This mat really soaks up the paint. This is the first coat. I eventually did two coats and then a little more to cover well the area that will be under the leaf stencil. The rest can have a more dry brush look.

I then placed the stencil on the mat and just started pounding the Old Tin Barn color on the spines and all around the leaf. You don’t have to do the whole thing at this point. I just did around the leaf area then removed the leaf stencil.

I then continued pouncing the Old Tin Barn color all around.

Using the same brush, without washing it out, I pounced the Bordeaux color on randomly over the Old Tin Barn, trying to blend it a bit.

Using the same brush again, I pounced on randomly the English Ivy color.

Using the same process, I added a bit of Possum Grape Jam color.

This photo shows all the different colors, much like you would see in nature in the fall.

The last step is to take the mat outside and give it a couple coats of the SPAR Urethane waterbased exterior sealer. It says it is gloss, but doesn’t show up gloss on the mat. I don’t think, once chalk-style paint cures for 30 days, a sealer is really needed, but in the meantime I think it just helps protect it a little.

And there it is! A beautiful Fall door mat. The pumpkin and acorn would also look nice.

And here’s my acorn one. I’m keeping this one. It’s pretty appropriate since we have a ton of oak trees (not to mention leaves) in our yard.

Turning a Funky Yellow Tray into a Rustic Faux Succulent Garden

I bought this tray about a year ago and never really did anything with it.

It’s not really wood and it was a funky yellow color. But yesterday, I decided. I would create a rustic, driftwood finish on it ….

…. and plant a faux succulent garden. Those seem really popular right now.

I already had the two pinkish succulents and I found a few more at Dollar Tree at some point in time. I removed the clips attached to those and saved the clips. You never know when they could be used. 🙂

Using our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint, I paint washed the tray with “French Roast”, wiping it down before it dried. When dry, I dry brushed with “Sunday Silver”, let that dry, then dry brushed with “Winter Gloves”. When that dried, I sanded the whole thing with 320 sandpaper, applied a wax salve, and buffed it. I love the color now! It now has a rustic, driftwood look.

This morning, I added some mosses from Dollar Tree and now have a beautiful succulent garden. I just need to figure out where I will display it.

Gray Weathered Wood Nesting Tables

https://sharsumpaint.com/2019/06/30/gray-weathered-wood-nesting-tables/

I have been searching for a good way to create a gray weathered wood look for a table top ever since I saw my cousin’s new dining room table. I was sure I could paint something similar.

These nesting tables had been waiting patiently for me to work the gray weathered wood magic on them. The time was now.

I came across a tutorial from Angela Marie Made which showed the look I was going for so I pinned it and waited for the right time to try it. Thank you so much for sharing this technique!

First up, the legs – the tables are well made – solid wood with metal inserts for the legs to screw into. I’m sure there is a furniture term for that but I do not know what that is. Just know the legs easily screw on and off with no worries. We cleaned, hand sanded, then cleaned again and they were ready for paint.

My original idea was to paint the legs a light gray, but once I painted one with a new custom color “MO Graystone” we created in our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint line, I knew it would be too light. So I started dry brushing “Sunday Silver” over the lighter gray, lightly in the detail areas and heavier on the rest! I used just a small amount of paint, dabbing most paint on the brush on paper towel first. This is a great way to distress without sanding and it was fun to watch it happen.

Two down, 10 to go!

Love this distressing technique

Table tops: My husband cleaned, sanded, and cleaned again (top and bottom) and I used Varathane Premium Fast dry stain in Kona. I stained the bottoms for a finished look but did not do the weathered wood finish on them. I thought that Kona would darken them a lot, but actually didn’t. The wood is a very hard wood so I probably could have given them another couple of coats, but I lack patience in waiting for oil stain to dry so I chose to do just one coat.

I watered down the “January” color 50/50 and painted it on, then wiped off excess and rubbed in what was left. I could tell it was going to be lighter so I also used a little “Sunday Silver” here and there and rubbed it in. Yes, it turned out lighter than my inspiration, but I love how it turned out.

Love when the furniture decides how a technique is going to look.

I put five coats of Varathane water based Crystal Clear polyurethane Satin on each table, sanding lightly between coats. I love the satin finish!

Now that I’ve experienced how nice this technique is, my plans are to use this finish on this farm table set I have to paint and sell. But that’s a project for another day.

From Coffee Bar to Buffet

We had the same table and chairs for years before we started painting and now have gone through several. We are now getting ready to change again.

This round table with 2 leaves and chairs we painted with our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint in Trading Post, Old Tin Barn, Sour Green Apple, and Crepe Myrtle and a mix of grays. We gave this set to one son and his family.

My coffee bar I repainted in a new gray we haven’t released yet and are calling MO Gray Stone. This is going to our other son and his family to match their farmhouse dining room table.

The farmhouse set in our dining room now is too big for the space so we will be giving it a makeover in the near future.

If you like the look of this set and would like us to customize it for you, just contact me for details and pricing.

But that means, I will need to be looking for a smaller set. 😁

Bringing a Garden Bench Back to Life!

This garden bench had good bones. It just needed some paint and the boards refreshed and I knew just the way to do it.

First of all – the paint. Our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint is perfect for the cast iron metal on this bench. It actually only took one coat of our gorgeous dark green color called “Evening Shade”. It also needed no sealer. Our chalk-style paint, when used on metals like this, cure naturally with the heat and the sun baking it in.

Yes, we ship!!! You can purchase all of our 45 colors in 16 oz. jars through our online distributor, Connie Mathews of Winston Home Designs.

The whole project took less than two hours, even when you have a cute little helper. 🙂

Next – the wood. The wood was in really good shape, just bleached out and dry. Wise Owl Salve in White Tea scent to the rescue! We don’t sell this product ourselves, but I love it and have used it to rehydrate wood and as a sealer on several projects. It comes in several wonderful scents! I purchase mine through a fellow painter in Massachusetts. I was fortunate to meet Sarah, of the Princess and the Peacock, while on a trip to visit my cousin, who lives about 30 minutes from her shop! I’ve linked her name to the Wise Owl Salve section of her online shop.

I tried to show in the photo below the difference the Salve makes in bringing the wood back to life!

The Salve is so easy to apply, then let it soak it, and buff. And Yes, you can use it on furniture left out in the weather, and we do have some weather here in Missouri. The bench may need a reapplication of wax down the road, but it only takes a few minutes so that isn’t a problem.

And that is all there was to it. This bench now looks almost brand new and holds a prominent spot in my front yard under the trees.

Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.

A Wax Resist Tutorial – Using Chalk-Based Paint and Furniture Wax

I have probably said it before, but I’m saying it again.  I LOVE playing with techniques and color on the 1970’s style plastic furniture.  I have been buying up wall vase sconces and wall candle holder sconces and trying out different techniques.  This is going to help me decide how to paint some solid wood furniture I have with the plastic fronts. These pieces are gorgeous when painted.

The technique I used on this set of wall sconces is a wax resist using the paint we sell, Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint.  Any chalk-based paint should work just as well.  Any furniture wax should work fine also. I used Annie Sloan clear wax mixed with gray paint just because I had it on hand.  Otherwise, I would have used just clear.  You can wait until it is fully dry (about 24 hours) and give it a light coat of wax and polish.  Just don’t rub too hard.

The wax resist, on these sconces, produces an old world layered effect that is just beautiful.  I used 4 colors. over the original gold of the plastic piece, “January” (a pure white), “Sunday Silver” (a medium gray), “Arlington Blue” (a medium blue), and “English Bluebells” (a light blue).

View the Tutorial Here:  https://youtu.be/pcmhZ5Ydb64 

Photos from the tutorial: