Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.

A Winthrop Style Secretary – Should it Stay or Should it Go?

I just can’t keep myself from picking up a paintbrush before Christmas. Last week, my childhood friend came to visit for a week (I’m fond of saying my best friend since 4th grade).  She was the one who introduced me to chalk paint in the first place. Now, she wanted to see me paint the Winthrop Style Secretary (Lammert’s Furniture in St. Louis – possibly around 1940’s) that had been sitting in my hallway for months.  I had purchased it at a resale shop and just hadn’t been able to decide how I wanted to paint it.  It did need painting on the outside and some work done on the drawers and pull down.  But the inside was really in pretty good shape and I wanted to leave it original if I could. So, what color would go with the wood and would be a neutral color that would fit in with just about any decor?

With my friend Cindy’s help, we decided on a new color I had asked Missouri Limestone Paint Company to mix.  I wanted a linen color and they came up with exactly what I had in mind…and named it “Vintage Linen”.  It is a gorgeous color and looks beautiful next to the wood on the Secretary.  I also made a glaze with French Roast and lightly glazed the feet and the finial and area around it.

We decided to paint it right in the hallway, so we put down some plastic and got started.  Since the lighting there wasn’t the greatest and it was a small space to work in, she was my assistant and held a flashlight and was quick to let me know if I missed a spot.  : )

I really become attached to pieces once I’ve painted them, and this piece was one that really makes me want to keep it, especially since it does fit in my living room nicely and blends in with my decor.  Once I decorated it with my snowman collection, I really fell in love.  I do have it for sale for $250.00, however, I’m perfectly happy if it doesn’t sell.  : )

Now for some pics!

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Even though the inside was in good condition, there were several spots and scratches.  My magic stain/sealer by Varathane (water-based) took care of that and restored the beautiful wood finish. It also refreshed the wood on the doors and the fretwork.

I think this one might be one that stays!

Update:  I didn’t have time to get too attached as it sold quickly.  : )

secretary_snowman

TIP OF THE WEEK: October 17, 2016 – Four Chairs and a Bench

Previous TIP OF THE WEEK

What a week we’ve had!  This week Danny and I worked with our friend, Michelle, to come up with a beautiful dining room set for a customer.  Michelle had the table and chairs but the customer also wanted a bench, preferably a church pew.  We had the task of staining and re-covering the chairs and finding a church pew or something like it.

chairsstainedforcustomerRepairing, staining, and covering the chairs – no problem.

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But, when it came to finding a small church pew, we were soon out of luck and time.  Danny had often talked about trying to turn chairs into a bench after we saw one, so we started thinking about finding some chairs and trying that. Michelle found us 4 chairs and we were off to Pinterest to learn how to make one.

We saw a  lot of chairs made into benches but many of them curved, due to the shape of the chairs.   And then we found what we were looking for! There were no detailed directions, just this simple paragraph and we had our “ah-ha” moment.  http://www.robomargo.com/bench.html 

KyLady wrote:  “We shortened the front piece on the middle chair and attached it to the corner of each of the outside chairs. If you do not shorten the front piece of the middle chair the bench would not have a straight front and back, it would curve since the fronts of chairs are wider than the backs. The only legs removed are the front ones on the middle chair, the other legs are the original chair legs. All you actually use on the middle chair is the entire back and the front piece.”

At first it didn’t sink in because we didn’t understand what she meant by shortening the front piece and attainspirationbenchching it to the corner of each of the outside chairs.  And then we got it.  Notice the middle chair has no front legs.  Removing them allowed the chairs to sit right next to each other.  This made the middle chair the same width in the front as in the back.  You can see in the photo it is narrower than the other two chairs. The front piece KYLady mentioned is that piece the arrow in the photo is pointing to.  That piece was saved and shortened and added back on so all 3 chairs would be the same in the front.  “Ah-ha”!

So now Danny was ready to start.  We only needed 3 of the chairs for the bench to get the size bench we wanted.  The fourth was still used, bench-3though. You will see how in the the photos below.

You can see the gap when the front legs were still on the middle chair in this photo.

In this photo, Danny has remobench-4ved the front legs of the chair and both the side and front pieces and has glued and clamped and screwed the middle chair to the other two.  He screwed them together right under the top edge and right under where the seat would go.  He shortened the saved front piece to fit the space in front, and then added dowels (and holes) to fit them together and glued it in place.

Rebench-6member that fourth chair? The back legs were broken on it anyway, so he used them to create beautiful curved sides for the bench. That was Michelle’s creative idea!  He cut them off even with the back of the chairs using a straight cut and then glued, clamped and screwed them on. He also cut a 1/2″ piece of plywood to fit, then sanded it for smoothness.

We were now ready to paint.  We used, of course, Missouri Limestone Company’s chalk-based paint in “Grannie’s Lace”, the brand we distribute and love to use!

With a little dry brushing of some water-downed Varathane water-based stain and sealer, we highlighted the embossed design on the front of the bench.  We added some fiberfill batting to the board, covered it with fabric and screwed it in place underneath. We sealed it with poly and the result was a beautiful bench.

Danny did a great job creating this work of art, don’t you think? The customer was thrilled!  She said she liked it even better than the church pew she had been thinking of originally.

Danny’s ready to make more as soon as he finds more chairs!  Be sure to contact us:  sharsumpaint@gmail.com if you’d like a custom made bench for your house.

bench-11 bench-12 bench-1bench-2

Getting ready for a Vintage Artisan Fair

SharSum Paint will be a vendor at the Vintage Artisan Fair in Eureka, MO on October 1, 2016.  We will be demonstrating Missouri Limestone Paint and will (hopefully) personally have quite a few painted and vintage items for sale!  Our niece, Elizabeth, has been busy painting with our Missouri Limestone Company’s chalk-based paint, too, and we will have her items for sale also.

We worked on furniture repairs and painted outside all day yesterday. It was so nice outside!  Here’s a sneak peek at an end table I’m working on for the fair. It will have an oval one to match. They will be available at the fair, if I don’t break down and sell them before. Shabby chic distress. Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Winter Gloves” dry brushed over the solid oak table. Drawers are painted with “Winter Gloves” then a coat of “Front Porch”. Distressed with steel wool to produce gray shading. Finished with Briwax. Waiting for painted hardware to dry. Ready to start the oval one to match. But not today.

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Here’s a few more items we plan on bringing (if they don’t sell first!

spigots 1880ssofatable groupofitemsforfair

spigots farmcabinet1 waterfallset vintage-chairs

Projects Painted and Sold Using Missouri Limestone Chalk-based Paint

It’s been awhile since I added sold projects, so thought I’d update and add a few.

This has to be my favorite piece I’ve sold. It was shipped all the way to Virginia. This was a watercolor technique I came up with, staining the wood with a paint wash. Read all about the Rags to Riches story of Sir Albert on my blog!

The unassembled parts of a hutch we recently finished for a client. Too big to put back together in my house. Don’t you just love the decoupaged knobs and drawer sides?

This dining room set is one of my favorite ones we’ve painted and sold.

Another favorite set.

We even paint and sell jewelry boxes.

Yes, this pink one is really a jewelry box.

This one was actually a gift. It is a memory box I made for my sister with a vintage photo of my mom and her sisters decoupaged on the top. Have a photo of your own? We have more jewelry boxes. We can copy your photo and make one for you!

This client owned set was just what she was envisioning. We even painted books to go in the basket we painted for one of the nightstands.

We paint and sell smalls, too. Like these vintage sewing machine drawers.

We have turned several Queen Ann captain chairs into colorful, whimsical works of art. This one we donated to my grandson’s kindergarten classroom.

Love how this one turned out!

We had fun with this set. Client purchased it to donate to a heart charity auction.

We painted a bunch of these cute little vases. Can paint these with your color choices. I love filling mine with fresh blooms from my yard.

This is a cute little cabinet we reinvented with a farmhouse look, custom painted with client color choice. We can do that. Just ask!!

This was a little bench I painted with Missouri Limestone Psint Company’s January and Crepe Myrtle. Stencils were cut using my Silhouette Portrait machine and contact paper.

This is another piece I really hated selling.  I was so wishing I had a 4 season room.  I would have kept this little table set in a heartbeat.

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This 1880’s sofa table is very long.  It really needed a paint job so we gave it one.  I distressed this piece with vaseline.  : )

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The original use for this spool was for electrical wiring a Lowe’s.  We transformed this into a little table, just perfect for a beach house.  I called a friend who had just purchased a beach house as a second home.  She thought so, too.  It is now happily content in its new home.  : )

spooltable

I had this waterfall set and custom painted it for a customer.  She wanted the dresser to be gray with some of the wood still showing.  The wardrobe’s inspiration was from a piece she saw on Pinterest.  We even found the same exact vinyl design on Amazon.

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Another Steam Punk look for a customer that loves the look.  The middle piece of marble was broken on this coffee table and had been replace by a piece of glass.  We covered a thin board with this map fabric from Jo-Ann’s and it fit perfectly under the glass.  Gave it a black paint job and sealed it with poly.

steampunktable

This was such a fun project!  This dated wooden nautical clock was blah, until I turned it into a Steam Punk look with a little black paint and wax.

nautical-clock

Love Pinterest.  That’s where we got the idea to take chairs and turn them into a bench.  The bench is 3 chairs put together.  We used the back legs of the 4th chair to create the sides.  This bench sold with a table and chair set my friend was selling. Love how it all turned out.

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bench-1

This is one of my first “restoration hardware” looks I did.  I really enjoy trying out different painting techniques.

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I loved painting the gray ombre desk so much, I painted the dresser that matched it the same way. The lady that bought the desk snatched up the dresser right away.ombredresser

I didn’t sell this one.  This is my front door, and my wrought iron furniture I have in my front yard.  The door is metal.  I did this about 3 months ago and still haven’t sealed it.  I’m not sure I will.  It is holding up well.

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This hutch and desk was a drab, yellowish color and had seen better days.  Painting it with varying shades of pink made all the difference in the world.

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This is one of my all time favorite pieces.  I would have kept this one if I had the room in my house.  finalpicfinalpicatnightdeskhutch3

We had another client who had 6 chairs that needed painting.  We took that project on and delivered them back home this past week.  They look gorgeous with the dining room table that was handcrafted by the husband.  A beautiful set at the fraction of what a new one would cost.

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Painted chairs – Missouri Limestone Paint – January


This little vanity table was a family heirloom.  It had been “antiqued” by the client’s grandmother back in the 1960’s.  Read more about that here.  The client had admired the Ombre desk I had completed and so the vanity has the same type of look, with the addition of a stencil to give it a french-style look.


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Ombre Desk Set – painted in varying shades of gray – Missouri Limestone’s Chalk-based Paint – Winter Gloves, Sunday Silver and Gray Goose. Lamp is painted with Indigo.

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Desk Lamp – Painted with Indigo


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Ombre Desk in it’s new home – 9 year old owner is said to be very excited. : )

bench

Piano/Storage Bench – painted with Trading Post

pet bed

Pet Bed – upcycled from a drawer – Painted with Coal Shovel

Lamp painted with Vintage Coral.

Lamp painted with Vintage Coral.

Spigot Planter

Spigot Planter – painted with “Clothesline”

Easter Candy Jars

Easter Candy Jars

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Small Tilt Table – Painted with Grannie’s Lace

cupboard green_memories

Memories Photo holder – painted with Coal Shovelv

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Spigot towel rack painted with “Clothesline”

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Small Detailed Cabinet – painted with Dark Roast on top (with poly sealer)  and Zinc on bottom (with clear wax and dark wax in detail area)

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The small table is sitting happily in its new home. Looks like the colors go perfectly with the decor in the home.

November Class Projects

The projects below are from November’s Make & Take It class.  They are now in place in the participants’ homes.  Very nice.  I will add more as I get them.  See photos from the class.

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Paint display at Gift Emporium & CAFE’, Sullivan, MO.  A variety of colors are available there for purchase.

display_GiftEmporium_Sullivan

SharSum Paint’s First Make & Take It Class was Fun!

SharSum Paint conducted their first class, November 2015, in a friend’s awesome shop area at her home.  Nine “students” were there and had a great time learning more about chalk-based painting and actually painting a project they brought. They had so much fun, they are ready to attend another in January.  In January, we will explore more with waxing and distressing techniques.

We will also be conducting classes at Gift Emporium in Sullivan.   We will plan on starting these classes around noon, so be sure to bring not only a project to paint, but an appetite, too.  Class sizes are limited to no more than 6-8.  Please check the Painting Classes link on our website menu for the next class.

Are you interested in hosting a painting class party in an area of your home with you and your friends?  In winter, do you have a heated garage or a basement just crying out for a paint party?  We can paint just about anywhere so you can be the judge on the best place and the number of friends (no more than 10).  Contact SharSum Paint (sharsumpaint@gmail.com)  for more details.

The biggest lesson to learn when first painting with chalk-based paint is paint in thin coats.  This will help your paint dry quicker and make a nice smooth chalk like finish.  The projects for our first class didn’t have time to dry enough for waxing, but as soon as they have waxed their projects and sent pictures of them, I will post their finished projects here.  For the next class, we will have hair dryers available for speeding up the drying process.  And remember, apply chalk-based paint in thin coats. This process is different than trying to cover an area in one coat.  You may need several coats, but the end result will be beautiful.

In the meantime, enjoy seeing this first group’s re-purposed objects come to life in the beautiful colors offered by Missouri Limestone Paint.