Paint a Pair of Leather Shoes in Less Than an Hour

I am not a newbie when it comes to painting shoes with chalk-style paint, specifically the brand we own and produce “Missouri Limestone Paint Company”. I’ve painted shoes made of quality leather as well as those that are from cheap man-made materials. Then I’ve worn the heck out of them. This latest pair I painted two coats and applied two coats of salve – all in less than an hour.

Oh my! These look ready for the trash! But they are so comfortable! Especially when I’m on my feet painting, apparently. Lol
But no more painting in this beautiful pair of shoes! They look brand new, don’t they?

Would you like to know how I did it? First, a sneak peek to see the transformation in progress.

I started out by cleaning the shoes well with Windex. This is my go to cleaner for many things I paint.

All the added color on this pair is from our chalk-style paint. This paint is on there for good, trust me. Cleaning didn’t remove it, nor could I scratch it off. I didn’t want to sand it or use chemicals on it, so…. I painted over it. 😏

Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint Color: Gray Goose
I painted the elastic on the strap, too.
I even painted the soles!

I also know from experience, our paint does very well on rubber. I painted a Rubbermaid mailbox several years ago….no sealer….and it still looks brand new today. So, I also painted the soles of this pair of shoes, but did not seal them.

Needs a second coat of paint

I painted the first coat. It dried quickly, but so also helped it along with a hair dryer. You can see the reddish look coming through along with the spots from the original paint splatters. But look! No brush strokes! Our paint (when applied in thin coats), does not leave brush strokes.

2nd coat covered well

It is time to apply the salve. I love Wise Owl Salve and keep it on hand for projects like this.

Can you tell which shoe has had the Wise Owl Salve applied? If you said the left one, you are correct!

As you can see, I applied the Wise Owl salve on the left shoe so you can see what a difference it makes.

Wow, right?

I applied the first coat of salve and buffed it. Then, I applied a light second coat and just rubbed it in, but did not buff. Remember, I DID NOT use the salve on the soles.

And there you have it! Another pair of shoes given a new life. I promise not to paint in these! I will periodically apply another coat of salve and buff it in.

A Faux Galvanized Tin Hanging Pendant Light

https://sharsumpaint.com/2020/08/06/a-faux-galvanized-tin-hanging-pendant-light/

I found a great tutorial for creating faux galvanized tin using paint. I repurposed this brass plated hanging pendant light and it looks like the real thing.

The tutorial shows it on a cardboard box. Since I was painting on metal, I used a spray primer first.

https://shellyhickox.blogspot.com/2015/04/decoart-media-faux-galvanized-canisters.html?m=1

This is what I did:

1. Took the light apart and scuffed up the pieces. Cleaned well.

2. Sprayed all pieces with primer.

3. Painted with Metallic Silver waterbased paint. I put a small amount in plastic cup and painted out of it. I even painted the cord.

4. Added a little Medium gray color chalk-style paint to the metallic, stirred it in, and using a piece of natural sponge, I dabbed it on each piece. I used our brand we own and produce: Missouri Limestone Paint Company.

5. Then I added a little white and dabbed again all over.

6. Then I added some black and dabbed again.

7. Finished by dabbing a little silver metallic with a brush, making sure there wasn’t much paint on the brush.

8. Sealed with Wise Owl Salve.

Repurposing a Faded Rubber Mat

I have been seeing people painting these worn out rubber mats. I even have one of my own I’ve been planning on painting. But mine was always black with a geometric design so I hadn’t been that motivated yet. I’m sure it will stand out, though, once painted with beautiful colors.

But then, this week, I found two faded flower ones for $1 each at a yard sale and I snatched them up!

We also picked up a couple of grandkids for the weekend so mom and dad could celebrate their anniversary. While the grands were content watching TV and playing on their devices, I thought I would just start on one to see what it was like. I am very impressed! They paint up great and are easy to paint.

I used our brand of chalk-style paint, Missouri Limestone Paint Company, in a variety of colors. I know rubber usually does well outside curing without sealing, but because this will get walked on a lot, I will seal it. I am leaning toward using a matte spray lacquer.

I was working on it on the dining room floor and one of my grandsons came over to see what I was doing. He wanted to help me and so he did. He’s not even in Kindergarten yet and he works so carefully. He is really a good painter. He also wanted to make a how-to video like his cousins had done so he has videos here, too. Of course, I would lose my helper until I changed colors. Then he’d be back again.

When we finished, he wanted to show how painting tired him out. Lol

Not only is he a good painter, he’s a comedian, too. 😂🥰

Here is the 2nd one. I used jewel tone colors on it. Sure missed having my little helper here as I worked on it.

Saving an Awesome Coffee Table from the Dead

What a makeover! This awesome slate topped huge coffee table was a custom job. We brought it back from the dead as it was in pretty rough shape with a finish that was the old thick rough and nasty varnish. Prepping is definitely the key! Quite the project, right? But once we finish, it will be perfect in the young person’s apartment (once moving day occurs). For now, it will go in mom and dad’s basement family room and still be used by young people. 🙂

The first thing you need to do is spend some time contemplating how to remove the top. Oh, and to find a place to store the slate top until needed again. No problem, it resided under our living room couch until needed. 🙂

It looks like there are screws. I think we will remove the top to make it easier to paint and to see if any repairs are needed. After many minutes of contemplating, the screws were removed. The only repair needed actually was one section on the bottom needed some glue.

The top sanded easily to get it smooth enough to paint. A good cleaning and two coats of our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint “Coal Shovel” and two coats of Varathane Crystal clear water based polyurethane in satin finish later, it was ready for curing.

The top is looking great!

Sanding the bottom piece wasn’t working at all. Danny got a good amount off with stripper, then I did another round of stripping with mineral spirits mixed in. That helped a lot. Then another round of mineral spirits. Cleaned well them sanded again. Used a tack cloth to get rid of any sanding dust. Then cleaned really well again. That finally got it smooth enough for painting.

Whoever says you don’t need to prep if you use chalk-style paint doesn’t know what they are talking about. It was definitely a process on this bottom piece!

Painted with two coats of Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint “Coal Shovel” (https://sharsumpaint.com/missouri-limestone-paint-company-colors/) and sealed with two coats of Varathane water based polyurethane in satin finish. This table is now ready to be put back together!

What an amazing difference!

Now came the task of lining the top and bottom holes for screwing it back together.

Bamboo skewers to the rescue! All holes are now lined up perfectly!

The beautiful slate top was rescued from under the couch and got a good drink of Wise Owl Lemon Verbena Salve. What a difference that made! It smells good now, too!

So happy how it turned out. This table is eventually going in a young person’s apartment. I can just see a group of young people gathered around it. Sitting on colorful pillows that could easily be stored underneath.

There will be a lot of fun times gathered around this coffee table! This is one sturdy, beautiful table now!
Love the black rippled slate top!

A Round Pedestal Table Gets an Amazing Makeover

I found this small (20.75” tall and 24” wide) solid wood table at a flea market about a year ago.

https://sharsumpaint.com/2020/07/16/a-round-pedestal-table-gets-an-amazing-makeover/

It was in good shape, but dated. It needed a makeover. We had sanded the top almost all the way, but it still needed a bit more to get it down to bare wood.

However, life got in the way and so it sat in our basement waiting patiently for its makeover.

A few days ago, it happened. I took the heat gun and stripped away the rest of the residue on the top, then sanded it smooth and hand scuffed the base. I cleaned it well.

I couldn’t wait to try out the DIY wood aging stain recipe I found and mixed up. It had been sitting waiting to be used for several weeks. I had tried it right after I mixed it up on a board. I think it reacts differently on different types of wood and it really hadn’t had a chance to darken the wood much. But, it turned out with a beautiful, natural wood look that I loved.

The stain is a mix of used coffee grounds, vinegar and steel wool. It doesn’t look very pretty in the jar, but wait until you see it on this oak table top!

Here’s the link to the DIY tutorial I found and used: https://www.familyhandyman.com/article/how-to-stain-unfinished-wood-with-used-coffee-grounds/?_cmp=stf

The interesting thing is you don’t see how it is working until it dries. At first it looks like it is just darkening the wood (and it darkens more as it dries) but when it dries, ahhhh….there is that beautiful grayish cast….just like old barn wood that has been left out in the weather for years. And this photo doesn’t even do it justice.

Hmmm…..At this point I happened to notice a strange formation in the grain going across the top. In my eye, I saw a llama head and neck. There are actually 4 of them, seeming to march in a line across the table, but this one stands out more than others. Still not seeing it? Let me help you. Lol

So now I had the stain on, but I wanted to really enhance the old wood look so I sealed it with a mix of liming wax and clear wax.

I wanted to open up the grain for the liming wax to get into it and stay so I used a wire brush and carefully ran it across the table top, going with the grain.

The liming wax I used is by Briwax. I mixed some of it with Howard’s Chalk-tique light wax. You can use any brand of clear wax, though. Mixing them together gives you a little more control over the liming wax and provides a nice finish. I think you can purchase both of these products from several places like Amazon online.

The next photo shows half the table top with the liming wax combo and half without. What a difference the liming wax makes!!

Can you see my 4 marching llamas? I know…. they are hard to see. Lol

Let me help. 🙂

Here is the top all waxed and buffed. Again, pics don’t really show just how beautiful this table top is. The sheen of the wax is gorgeous!

By the way, did you know wax helps repel dust? So using wax on furniture that isn’t going to get a lot of heavy use will save you dusting time, too!

The little metal feet needed a makeover, too, so I took them off and spray painted them a metallic gold. So pretty now!

Now it was time to paint the base. Sometimes I use primer, sometimes I don’t. I didn’t on this one. I had just cleaned and scuffed it up really well. In retrospect, I wish I had primed this and I wouldn’t have had to use as many coats of chalk-style paint, especially since I wasn’t going to distress this piece. I used 4 coats of Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January”, a pure white. You tend to need more coats when using white or very light colors.

But all is well as chalk-style paint dries so quickly. Once the paint coats had all dried well I sealed the base with several thin coats of Varathane Crystal Clear water based polyurethane. I never have had a problem with yellowing in the 6 years I’ve been using it.

The secret is thin coats and no drips or pooling. I use a round damp car wax sponge to put on a thin coat and follow it with a sponge brush if needed to clear up any drips or pooling. For long areas I go in one direction only and work quickly. You can’t go back and forth or overwork the sealer or you will have a mess as it dries so quickly.

And now…. drum roll ….. My finished “llama table!” 😉 What a difference, right?

A One of a Kind Floral Cow Skull Tray/Wall Hanging Decor

I’ve been on a kick creating stencils lately of farm animals on my Silhouette machine. My latest project has become my favorite! 🙂 I also tried a new staining technique on this one. I will definitely be using this technique again.

I started with a plain new pine board. Danny, my husband and partner in our world of painting and creating, had previously cut a long pine board into 9 x 11 1/2” boards, sanding and rounding the edges. Some we will make into cutting boards, but this one I wanted to make a tray that could also hang up and be used as a wall decoration.

My idea was to give the board a natural, white washed look. I created a coffee stain with used coffee grounds, vinegar, and a steel wool pad. Here’s the tutorial I used: https://www.familyhandyman.com/woodworking/staining-wood/how-to-stain-unfinished-wood-with-used-coffee-grounds/?_cmp=stf

This worked well to darken the wood and bring out the grain. I would have liked for the wood to have been a little darker. When this dried, and after 3 coats, I still thought it would be a little darker but it was fine. I let the solution sit for 24 hours after I mixed it. The next time, I think I would let it sit several days.

After drying, the board was ready for the white wash, I mixed our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company (MLPC) “January” with a little water, painted it on, then used a damp rag to rub it in and wipe it off. I let that dry well and it was ready to stencil.

I really liked the look of the end result – I will be using this technique on a small table top next.

It was now time to stencil. I found an SVG image I loved on Etsy from HeyLena Arts and purchased it. https://www.etsy.com/listing/744390593/cow-skull-svg-floral-wreath-svg-boho-svg?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=floral+cow+skull+svg&ref=sr_gallery-1-3&organic_search_click=1&pro=1

I uploaded the SVG file to my Silhouette machine, traced it and cut it out, using Contact paper. I find this is a cheap and easy way to cut stencils. The Contact paper adheres nicely and is easy to remove. I also use clear Contact paper to transfer the stencil to my project. Press n Seal will also work as a transfer.

Then I did all the “weeding” (picking out the areas of vinyl) for the dark area of the skull. I stenciled those areas with MLPC “French Roast”, a dark brown.

For the flower area, I decided the best way to finish that would be to hand paint it, so that’s what I did. I am no artist, but I did learn to pretty much stay in the lines when coloring in elementary school. ☺️

The MLPC colors used: Crepe Myrtle, Farmhouse Green, Cornflower, Radio Flyer, Sour Green Apples, English Bluebells, and MO Buttercup.

Once all the flower area was dry I sealed front, back, and sides with Varathane water-based Crystal Clear Polyurethane in Satin Finish. I used 5 thin coats for durability. This piece may be used as a tray so I wanted it to stand up to hard use. (It was so pretty out I did the sealing on my deck. I had my book and coffee handy and read while my sealer dries. It only took about 10 minutes for each on this day.)

Now it was time for the handles. I remembered seeing a DIY on Pinterest for creating handles out of strips of leather. I happened to have the perfect belt made of genuine cowhide that I thought would be perfect! I had purchased it at Goodwill some time ago to create handles for a suitcase dresser, so used it for this project instead. I cut two strip of 8” each and we attached them to the edges of the top and bottom of the board using vintage wood screws.

This beautiful, floral cow skull tray/ wall hanging decoration is now complete! I absolutely love how it turned out!

Here are the other projects I have recently completed.

This is a charcuterie/cheese board
Wall decoration

Turning a Funky Yellow Tray into a Rustic Faux Succulent Garden

I bought this tray about a year ago and never really did anything with it.

It’s not really wood and it was a funky yellow color. But yesterday, I decided. I would create a rustic, driftwood finish on it ….

…. and plant a faux succulent garden. Those seem really popular right now.

I already had the two pinkish succulents and I found a few more at Dollar Tree at some point in time. I removed the clips attached to those and saved the clips. You never know when they could be used. 🙂

Using our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint, I paint washed the tray with “French Roast”, wiping it down before it dried. When dry, I dry brushed with “Sunday Silver”, let that dry, then dry brushed with “Winter Gloves”. When that dried, I sanded the whole thing with 320 sandpaper, applied a wax salve, and buffed it. I love the color now! It now has a rustic, driftwood look.

This morning, I added some mosses from Dollar Tree and now have a beautiful succulent garden. I just need to figure out where I will display it.

Transfer an Image with Varathane Water-based Polyurethane

Be sure to visit our SharSum Paint Facebook page to see more of our work.

Using a water-based poly to transfer an image???  I am in love with this method for transferring an image.  I have tried many different ways with several degrees of success.  This is by far the easiest and quickest and the best results I’ve found.

I’m not sure why I haven’t run across it before, but when I saw how this video tutorial by The Craftsman transferred the images using water-based poly I knew I had to try this.  The video is linked from The Graphics Fairy site, which has an amazing selection of files free to use.  I found a French Handwriting Script  that worked perfectly.  I chose the reverse image as I would be transferring text.

The Craftsman is entertaining and a very good tutorial.  I linked it above as it is buried on The Graphics Fairy site under Transfer Methods.

Note on changes I made from what is suggested in the video:

  1. In the video, The Craftsman used a product called Poly-Finish (which is a poly acrylic).  In another tutorial I read,  Minwax Polycrylic was used.  I used Varathane water-based crystal clear polyurethane in satin finish as that is what I use on all my furniture. It worked perfectly.  So, your favorite water-based poly should work also.
  2. The video transfers onto raw wood. I had already painted a chair with chalk-based paint and had put one coat of poly on before I ran across this technique.  The results were amazing, so this works not only over a painted surface, but one that has had a poly coating already added.
  3. I wet the edges and tore them (a trick I learned on another site).  This helps hide a straight edge that might be more noticeable. Even with removing the paper, there will still be a thin layer of paper that remains.

There was another tutorial I ran across that reiterated using poly to transfer images and she shows how to do it over chalk-based paint.  In this tutorial, she creates her own rulers. to make a great looking tray!  People are so creative!  Thanks for sharing, Cheltenham Road:  https://cheltenhamroad.wordpress.com/tag/polycrylic-image-transfer-method/

A client wanted her ladder back chair to have a French Handwriting Script across the ladder backs. See update at the bottom for info on the inspiration for the handwriting script on a ladder back chair. I thought of several different ways I could accomplish that, including using a stencil, but I really wanted to do a transfer.  Here are the steps I used.  I am extremely happy with the final result.  The whole process literally took less than an hour.

Practice make Perfect – I thought it would be a good thing to practice first.  Please do not mind my ugly practice board.  Just focus on the script, which literally just took minutes to do.

I printed out several reverse copies of the French Handwriting Script from The Graphics Fairy.  I decided how I wanted them to look on the ladder backs, then trimmed them.  I also wet down the edges and tore them so they wouldn’t be straight as mentioned above.  Notice in the photo I tore 3 sides on the first one  That was before I realized the top and bottom wouldn’t show anyway as I wanted it to go off the wood, but the sides would end, so I really only needed to wet and tear the sides of each.

I put the chair on its back to make it easier to work with.  Each ladder back will have a liberal coat of poly painted on.  I did one ladder back at a time, putting on the poly, then adding the image with the script facing down.

Each time I added the image, I made sure to smooth it down well, including around the edges.  I used a credit card to burnish it into the wood and make sure there were no wrinkles.  I literally let this dry only about 15 minutes (poly dries quickly).  I won’t lie….I’m impatient.  I even used a hair dryer to make sure it was really nice and dry.

It was then time to saturate the paper with water.  In the photo below, you can see I am painting water all over the paper.  I worked with just one ladder back at a time.  After it was thoroughly saturated, I let it sit a minute or two.

This next step was fascinating!  Unlike other transfer methods, starting at the corners, the paper almost completely peels away.  I peeled as much as possible this way first.

After the first peel, I  used a rough texture wet washrag and carefully rubbed away the rest of the paper.  I let dry just a bit (ok….maybe used a blast or two from the hair dryer) so I could see if there was any paper left.  There was, so I used the wet rag to rub some more.

It was now time to let it dry.  Yes, I might have used the hair dryer again.  LOL.  But anyway, once dry, I gave each ladder back several coats of poly, not only for durability, but the coats of poly make the thin layer of paper that remains seem to disappear.

And now, for the beautiful, final results!

How about this closeup?  I’m so in love with this!!!!

All three ladder backs:

Chair is now complete.  The only thing left to do is to seal the new paper rush seat for durability.And…..would you believe we wove new paper rush seat for this chair?  The client really wanted to save her heirloom chair and the original rush seat was in bad shape, so I found a great tutorial for that, too.  If you ever need to weave rush for a ladder back chair, you have to watch this youtube tutorial:

But that’s not all!  I wanted to put a fleur de lis on the knobs of the desk/vanity that will do with the chair.  Easy peasy with the poly transfer.  Hint:  If you rub away a bit too much, no problem.  That’s what black Sharpie permanent markers were made for.  LOL

Update:  My client saw a chair with French handwriting script and asked if I could do something like that with her chair.  I found the creator of this chair and requested permission to use her chair for inspiration. (I always ask permission of artists if I can find out who they are.)  She graciously allowed me to do that.  Gina Kellogg of Kellogg Frosted Furniture (isn’t that a great business name) I thank you.  You can see Gina’s beautiful chair here.

And now for the final reveal:

I first sealed the new rush seat with a 50/50 mix of shellac and denatured alcohol.  Then I stained it with another favorite Varathane product. (I just love the Varathane products but are not affiliated with them in any way)  I used Varathane water-based stain and polyurethane in Dark Walnut.

I am now thinking of all kinds of possibilities for using these transfers:  jewelry boxes, cutting boards, photos on wood, hmmmm….will it work on fabric?  I’m off to try that possibility.

 

 

 

A Wax Resist Tutorial – Using Chalk-Based Paint and Furniture Wax

I have probably said it before, but I’m saying it again.  I LOVE playing with techniques and color on the 1970’s style plastic furniture.  I have been buying up wall vase sconces and wall candle holder sconces and trying out different techniques.  This is going to help me decide how to paint some solid wood furniture I have with the plastic fronts. These pieces are gorgeous when painted.

The technique I used on this set of wall sconces is a wax resist using the paint we sell, Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint.  Any chalk-based paint should work just as well.  Any furniture wax should work fine also. I used Annie Sloan clear wax mixed with gray paint just because I had it on hand.  Otherwise, I would have used just clear.  You can wait until it is fully dry (about 24 hours) and give it a light coat of wax and polish.  Just don’t rub too hard.

The wax resist, on these sconces, produces an old world layered effect that is just beautiful.  I used 4 colors. over the original gold of the plastic piece, “January” (a pure white), “Sunday Silver” (a medium gray), “Arlington Blue” (a medium blue), and “English Bluebells” (a light blue).

View the Tutorial Here:  https://youtu.be/pcmhZ5Ydb64 

Photos from the tutorial: 

 

 

Chalk-based Paint Q and A – A Recorded Live Video

Last Friday evening, I sat down to do my first Live Video on Facebook.  After stressing pretty much all day about it and primping like I was getting ready for a first date, I was ready.  It seemed almost too easy to set up so I was a little worried.  I got in about 5 minutes early just to make sure I knew what I was doing and 30 seconds later, I got the message that I had a poor connection and the little hamster wheel just started spinning.  Great!  I’ve had enough experience with technology, though, I just canceled it and started over.  That time I connected and it was smooth sailing (kind of) the rest of the evening.

Another lesson I learned was that there is evidently a rule that says you can only do an hour. Oops…didn’t know that.  One hour in and people weren’t wanting to leave, so I did 45 more minutes.  I also learned you can stop after an hour.  Wait 5 minutes, then reconnect.  I’m glad I didn’t do that and I’m glad Facebook didn’t cut me off, recorded the whole thing, and didn’t put me in Facebook jail for not following rules.  Whew!  Live and learn.

The biggest thing I would do differently would be to actually use the laptop sitting in front of me.  I was so stressed about it failing the first time, that when I saw the comments start coming up on my phone, I was so relieved, I didn’t think to start it on my computer.  In fact, I remember wondering why I wasn’t seeing it on my computer.  So, I spent the whole time leaning forward peering into the phone to see that tiny little print.  LOL

But once into it, I really enjoyed it.  There were a lot of questions and I was able to share a lot (although it was hard to share when questions kept scrolling through).  I tried to go back to see them but there were some I missed.  I did go back after and answered them on the recorded video.  It was also a little bit fun to “have the floor” so to speak with no one interrupting and me not talking over anyone else.  LOL

It was a great experience, all in all, and I will do it again.  In fact, one viewer suggested doing a live video during a painting class we have coming up on September 30, so we will be working that into the class.  Stay tuned for an update on that.

It is also important that you create an Event for a live video, usually about a week ahead of time.  Then people can join it and will be reminded when it is time for the live video.  I did this quickly, so I only had the event for the day.  I had so many viewers and reached so many people by sharing it with the online course I’m taking and the instructor shared it with one of the other groups she admins.  That was extremely helpful.  I also shared it in the groups I’m in that allows that, on my personal page, and on Instagram.

So…..are you ready to view my very first Live Video.  It really was like having friends come over on a Friday evening.  Too bad I didn’t think to serve wine. LOL .  I do want to warn you that sometime after the first hour, someone asked me to show something I had painted, so I grabbed my phone and tripod and took them on a tour of my living room.  LOL.  I was afraid I might have made them seasick.

And remember.  Be kind.  I am a newbie at this.