Dry brushed Desk and Hutch

This has been one of my favorite pieces I’ve painted.  I really wish I would have had room in my house to keep it, but it sold very quickly.  I’m so happy it sold to a family who had adopted several kids and wanted it to put in a bedroom, but once the lady saw it, she was going to display it in one of her main rooms instead to show it off.  Here it is in all its glory but since I recently was asked how I did this, I am going to show you some steps on how it came to be.  

I put off doing anything with it for months because I wasn’t looking forward to trying to paint inside those little cubbies on the hutch.  I even sold it to a painting friend because I wanted it out of my living room.  But then….I ran across a post from a lady describing how she had painted a desk using the dry brush technique.  And, wow!!!! It was the same exact desk I had.  They say imitation is the greatest form of flattery, but I did show her what I had done when finished.  She loved it!  She laughed and said she thought it was her piece at first.  So I thank her sincerely for the inspiration to try something like this as I never had attempted anything like it.  It was time I bought my desk and hutch back from my friend. I was sure glad she still had it. : )

Here you have the original desk and hutch.

As you can see, it is your standard oak.  The desk even had a hard laminate type top.  No problem.  It was time to start.

I cleaned the whole thing thoroughly.  We usually use a spray cleaner like windex and clean well and rinse well and let dry.  I then scuffed up the whole thing by hand with just 220 sandpaper, just to rough it up a little.  No major sanding need.

I took out the drawers and decided it would be easier to take the back off the hutch to paint it.  When we did, what do you know?  All those little cubbie slats came out!  The hutch ended up being a breeze to paint, too.

The drawers I painted with a couple of coats of a light turquoise with the paint we sell and use called Missouri Limestone Paint Company and the color is “Front Porch”.  Love the name.  Doesn’t it remind you of the color of the slats on the ceilings of the old farmhouse porches?  I distressed the drawers a little, too.  I even painted the cute little knobs I found at a yard sale and the wooden part of the handle with the color “Harvest Pumpkin”.  I did seal those with poly. The drawers have a slightly gray shading to them.  I did that by rubbing them with very fine steel wool.  That really makes a nice look.

 

I did a little video at the time to show how to drybrush, using the color “January”.  In this case, I wanted some of the oak showing through.  The big thing is not to have too much paint on your brush and then dab most of it off.  Fair warning – this video is in no way professional.  And yes, I sometimes paint in my dining room.  I have severe garage envy.

This hutch also had a corkboard.  I painted it with a coat of Zinsser Bulls Eye Shellac first to keep the paint from soaking in too much, then painted a couple of coats of “Front Porch”.  I used a little of the “Front Porch” to get into the grooves of the detail on the top of the hutch.

I painted a chair with “Front Porch” and distressed it after the paint dried with a slightly damp scrubber sponge.  Used the scrubber to distress, then the sponge to wipe clean.

I sealed the whole piece with several coats of wax.  We use toulene-free Briwax.

I hope this tutorial inspires you to dry dry brushing.  It is very easy to do, and the results can be spectacular.  I have a few more photos of the process for you to enjoy.

corkboard

Painting the corkboard

paintedcubbies

Painting the cubbie slats and bottom

hutchwithoutbackandcubbies

Hutch without the back

 

 

 

 

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Meet “Rusty Missouri Glass”

Today I found out that maybe, just maybe, I might become an artist after all.  You know…kind of like Grandma Moses who started painting in earnest at the age of 78. The month I go on Medicare I find out I can actually come up with a piece of art on my own….visualizing something in my head and having it actually become a piece of art before my eyes.  What a rush!  But, before I quit my day job (retirement)….ok and teaching online part time and painting and selling furniture and pieces of art I create, I confess I was inspired by a technique I learned from an excellent tutorial I saw in one of my painting groups. But, hey! Let me have my moment.  I usually have to see something someone else does and be inspired by it and then create what I’ve seen done. Yes, I am usually a follower.  Today, I “moved to the front of the line”, if only for a moment, and it felt great!

Now that you know I am this famous artist, I’m going to show you how I learned this awesome technique of creating rust with paint and cinnamon. Yes, cinnamon!  It is really pretty amazing and so much fun to do.

First things first:  You have to watch this awesome, awesome, awesome video tutorial on how to create rust by Fiona Debell.  This lady is very talented and I love that she shares her talent.  Otherwise, I would have never known I could be an artist, even if it is for just one project.  So, here is the video, linked here with Fiona’s permission.  https://www.facebook.com/fiona.marie21/videos/10155133360103787/ 

If you’d like to join her Facebook group called “How to Paint Like a Pro” click on the link below: https://www.facebook.com/groups/howtopaintlikeapro/  There are a lot of good tutorials and good people to help answer your questions about painting.

So how did I become an artist today?  It was an accident.  After watching Fiona’s video, I thought I would practice her technique.  I was in Dollar Tree and I saw these neat square pictures labeled Wall Art on the back and all encased in plastic.  I thought the art must be a thin piece of wood or heavy cardboard so thought that would be good for practice, so I bought one.  When I got home and removed the plastic, I saw it was actually a picture frame and the wall art was a piece of paper.  Hmmm…I wondered if it would be possible to use this technique on glass?  Now, I know that glass is a pretty slick surface for paint, but Fiona did show that once dry, the paint she used was hard as a rock and didn’t scratch off, but still, I wasn’t sure about glass. Since I was experimenting, I decided to give the glass a little grip and sprayed it with Zinsser spray shellac.  I honestly don’t know if the shellac made a difference or not, but the paint I used became as hard as a rock on the glass and doesn’t scratch off, so I’m not taking any chances and will use Zinsser on future pieces.  

Supplies:

*Square Picture frame (Wall Art) from Dollar Tree – Size 10″ x 10″

*Chalk paint – I sell a brand of chalk paint so naturally I used my brand which is Missouri Limestone Paint.  I used “Coal Shovel” (black), “River Bottom Dirt” (brown) and “January” (white).

*The magic ingredient to get good texture – I used a powdered limestone I bought on Amazon. See photo in the Step Section below.

*Cinnamon – yes, the kind you use in your food.  The plus side of this is your project starts smelling really nice.  You might get hungry at this point.

*Stencil of Missouri – I found a free Silhouette cut file online.  I resized it to about 6.5 W and 7.75 H.  Here’s the link to the state file.  They have one for every state.

*220 Sandpaper for very, very light sanding on the map

*Furniture Wax – clear and dark

Process:

Step 1:  Mix the powdered limestone with the black and brown paint until you get it so thick you can put it on the glass pane with the stir sticks.  I know it is hard to see but the pane of glass is lying on the tablecloth with some of the paint on it.  

Step 2:  Add a little black and then a little brown and blend them together.  You’ll still want some of the brown showing but you don’t want to see two distinct colors, you want them to blend.  Dab around until you like the look you get.  Save any leftovers of this and some “January” to dry brush the frame later.

Step 3: Your now going to sprinkle a little cinnamon over cinnamonyour wet textured paint, probably a little more on the edges, where you would see more rust. Kind of stand the pane of glass up and tap the back so any loose cinnamon will fall off.  Don’t disturb the rest.

Step 4:  Let dry.  The drying process will take awhile as your paint is so thick.  I let mine dry overnight.  Just like with Fiona’s brand of paint and texture medium, mine was as hard as a rock when dry.

Step 5:  You are now ready for the stencil.  I centered my stencil and made sure the edges were down really well.  It is hard to do with such texture, but I was very careful when stenciling.  (What little bleeding I got, I touched up later with a small artist brush and some of the black/brown mixture.  Then I put paint on a stencil sponge and really offloaded most of the paint (by dabbing on a paper towel) before starting to stencil.  I was very careful on the edges using the dobber.  I had to go back with a regular small paint brush to get in some of the nooks and crannies in the center area of my textured map.

Step 6:  I also dry brushed the picture frame with the white and left over black and brown texture material until I got the look I wanted.

Step 7: I used a little 220 sandpaper and lightly distressed the map a bit…Very light.

Step 8:  I used clear wax over the whole thing, and then the dark wax.  The dark wax is what gives the map that rustic look.  It really is hard to remember this beautiful piece of art started out as a pane of glass in a picture frame.

My experiment became my first piece of art I created. If you make one, please add a photo of your project to the Comments below.  I’d love to see how others turn out. Thanks!

Final Reveal:  Rusty Missouri Glass

 

 

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Alice in Wonderland Table

Sweet Serendipity is one of my favorite sites to follow. She is always creating beautiful one of a kind pieces of furniture. Most of all, she is so good at sharing techniques of how she does it. This is one of my favorite pieces she’s done lately. She based it on the children’s book, “Alice in Wonderland” and as I teacher, it really spoke to me. She was kind enough to share in this tutorial how she created it. Enjoy!

You’re not mad, you say??? “You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”……  Click on the link below to view the tutorial.

Source: We’re All A Little Mad…

Sweet Serendipity can also be found on Facebook

Tip of the Week – Did you know? You Can Make Your Own Drawer Knobs?

See previous Tips of the Week here.

TIP OF THE WEEK:  April 28, 2017 –  Did you know?  You can make your own drawer knobs.

It has been awhile since my last tip.  Sorry.  I’ve been a little busy with Easter, grands, and painting.  But this tip got me back in the saddle again, so to speak.

I have pretty much been obsessing all day today about drawer knobs.  I started my latest painting project last night – a 13 drawer chest.  Yes 13 drawers!  I couldn’t wait to start on this and have been thinking about drawer knobs and pulls for several weeks now.

Here’s a little sneak peek of my beauty in progress.

Before:

Stain/Painted Drawers:  Different pastel hues

But back to my obsession.  13 drawer = 23 knobs.  I thought at first I would like handles, but that just didn’t seem right, plus I didn’t want plugged holes and didn’t want to drill new ones.  So, then I moved onto – glass knobs.  I wanted something light and possibly beachy looking (rather than boring old wooden knobs).  However, I’m cheap and didn’t want to pay more than $1 for them and I wanted them NOW.  Did I also mention I’m IMPATIENT when I want something?

So, I went to my friendly facebook group on painting furniture (Painted Furniture Before and After Questions and Answers).  That name about says it all, doesn’t it?  If you are a painter of furniture, you really should join this group.  It is very helpful.  I think there were over 50 posts back and forth over my question on where to buy cheap glass knobs.  Lots of ideas and inspiration was shared – so much so I started rethinking what I wanted.  Someone mentioned Sea Glass spray paint.  That was a great idea.  I’ve heard of that.  Then I wondered if it would work on porcelain knobs because I had quite a few of them.  Not enough, but could get more cheaper than glass.  But I still wasn’t entirely sold on that idea.  In the back of my mind, I’m thinking that I’ve seen actual (or fake) sea glass pieces.  So now my obsession is moving toward that idea.  I couldn’t see myself gluing sea glass to the top of a wooden knob, though.  So, I was stuck there for awhile.

I went back to painting drawers and all the while I’m looking around the shop area thinking what could you use for a bottom so that a screw would go into it.  Of course, nothing jumped out at me.  So, it was back to Google.

I think I started searching using sea glass spray paint on porcelain knobs and saw a link that said “make your own drawer knobs” so I tried that.  The big Pinterest pic showed a decoupage look on a wooden knob so I didn’t go there (yet).  I just started scrolling down.  Wow!  I hit the drawer knob jackpot.  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/527413806331630014/

But there it was – Make your own Drawer Knobs.  I clicked on the link and what do you know…..you can use something to make the bottom of a drawer pull. Here’s the link to the website:  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/337840409518371097/

The piece you need is called in hardware terms, a connector nut or connector cap.  Who knew?

So, for now, my obsession is on finding these connector caps and seeing how expensive they are and maybe buying some pieces of real (or fake) sea glass.  Or maybe check more into the sea glass spray paint.

Decisions.  Does everyone obsess over something so simple as drawer knobs when painting?  If so, I hope I have helped you in your search.  I saw this meme the other day in one of my groups.  I’m sorry I don’t know if the person cited is the original creator or not, but it is perfect.  I think it sums up my feelings about all this redefining furniture and turning it into one of a kind “masterpieces.”

Patio Chairs Prettily Painted

Click here for previous Tips of the Week

TIP OF THE WEEK:  March 28, 2017 – Patio Chairs Prettily Painted

I was on a swap site close to my home and noticed a set of patio chairs for sale. I knew these had potential to look great again. They looked to be an expensive set at one time and I had looked for some of these comfortable swivel rockers last year so I knew how expensive they were. I just happened to comment on the post that whoever bought them could PM me and I’d tell them how they could paint them. A funny thing happened. The lady selling them PM’d me. Long story short….she removed her post….hired me to paint them for her….and is planning an in-home painting class this summer. She was thrilled with the final result and was hoping to get at least two more years out of them as they were going to be selling and moving closer to a daughter in another state. So, this was a win-win for both of us.

As you can see, even though the metal was in great shape and only needing painting, the fabric on some of the chairs was pretty threadbare in areas. It would be good to note that if you are planning on painting patio furniture fabric, you’ll have even more success than we did with these. They turned out very nice, but some were pretty threadbare and that still shows.

 

 

What I did next is not what you want to do next. On the first chair I painted the metal black first. That was a mistake. Why? Because when you paint fabric, you’ll want to wet the chair down first and then add some water to your paint – in this case we used the Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-based paint that we sell in the color “Crisp Kale”. So…..when painting with watered down paint, you’re going to to get that watered down mess all over your freshly painted black metal! What was I thinking? That one had to have metal repainted in many areas. So….moral of that story is paint the fabric first.

I also taped off the first one. I didn’t need to do that at all. My chippy brush allowed me to paint the black and not touch the green fabric, so no tape was used on the other chairs.

There were a couple of chairs that were really pretty threadbare. I had read that you could repair those with Bondo. I did that and those areas turned out ok and the paint covered them well, but I would recommend only using it if you had a small hole to fix. I wouldn’t do larger areas again.

I never use a roller when I paint with chalk-based paint but for the first coat on these chairs I did since the paint was watered down. That really helped the paint get into the threads of the fabric and adhere. I did two more coats, using a brush for them and that worked out great!

 

There is no need to seal chalk-based paint for outside furniture. The sun and heat cures the paint and makes it very durable.

Were they perfect after painting? No, not by any means. Will they hold up for my client for a few years? Yes, they should work out just fine for her. Are people going to be going up and getting eye to eye with the chairs and searching for flaws? I hope not. : ) Or, will they see the overall picture of the bright and cheerful patio chair set on her patio and wish they had one just like it. That’s what I’m hoping for! In the natural light and with the grass peeking through and trees starting to bud out in Missouri, the set looks beautiful on her deck, don’t you think?

 

Nightstands & Storage Bench

The problem (not really a problem) with selling chalk-based paint is that with everything you paint, you really want to keep it all. Take my bedroom….we bought nightstands about a year ago. We’d never had nightstands before much less matching ones and I was going to paint them. We bought themnightstands_somethingblue at Mary Ann’s Home Decor and Consignment in Rolla, Missouri, about a year ago and they were in such good shape I really didn’t want to paint them. So, I compromised and painted just the drawer fronts, then gave them a coat of wax. I’ve really enjoyed the size and the drawers and the drawer fronts I painted with Missouri Limestone Chalk-based paint in the color “Something Blue”, which is similar to a light teal color.

Then about a storagebench_pier1month ago, our son Trevor found at an estate sale in Cape Girardeau,  a really neat rattan storage bench for me to paint and sell. It was from Pier 1 Imports originally.

Hmmmm…that would look so nice painted with the same color as my drawer fronts and sitting at the foot of my bed storing clean sheet sets. I gave this a couple of coats  of polyurethane for protection.bedroom_somethingblue1

 

 

 

 

 

Sold! To me!  See, I told you it was a problem. I had to keep this one.

bedroom_somethingblue

Update: Painted Kitchen Cabinets and Countertops

We’ve had so many people lately wondering about painting their kitchen cabinets and what to do about outdated counter tops, I thought I would share the post documenting what we did with ours around 2014.  Both the cabinets and counter top are holding up well and I still love them.  Click here to see the blog on our kitchen makeover. The information about our kitchen is toward the bottom of that post.

I used Annie Sloan chalk paint on my cabinets….Annie Sloan was my introduction to chalk-based paint and I was in love.  I still like the Annie Sloan line. At the time, I didn’t even mind the price as it does go a long way.  It was hard to find in my area, though, and there weren’t a lot of color choices. Then, we stumbled across Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint, founded in the Missouri Ozarks, and the rest is history.  We are now established distributors of this line, selling paint and painting to sell, and I am more in love with chalk-based paint than ever!

The counter top product we used is truly amazing:  Daich Coatings Spreadstone Countertop Finishing Kit.  It was a long process but well worth it in the end.  To this day, it looks pretty much the same as the day we finished it.  It is wearing very well and I am very happy with it.  Our counter top was the 1980’s white “leather-look” laminate.  I thought we would be able to sand it down, but that was wishful thinking. That laminate is tough stuff.  So, underneath my lovely counter tops with flecks of colored stone, is an interesting “leather-look”, but it really doesn’t detract from the looks of the counter top at all.  Read more about our counter tops on my Pinterest Board.

The Daich Company advertises they give you a generous supply.  That is true.  We had a lot left over in our kit.  I ended up a couple of years later doing the top of a laminated kitchen table to match the counter tops.  This company now has a new finish called Mineral Select, that looks amazingly like (from the photos on their website) a granite or quartz counter top!

I highly recommend chalk-based paint for painting cabinets.  These days I naturally recommend using the product we sell, Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-based paint, available in 4 locations in the Sullivan, Missouri area and then sealing the cabinets with polyurethane. The quality and price of our product is outstanding.

For countertops I recommend the Daich Coatings products. I have no affiliation with this company.  I just know I used it, loved it in 2014 and still love it now.  I just checked out their prices and the Spreadstone product we used is even cheaper than when we purchased it.

If you have any questions, I’d be happy to answer them.  Just fill out the form below and I will get back to you within 24 hours.