Pottery Barn Inspired Knotted Cement Rope

Ever since I saw a YouTube video on how to DIY the Pottery Barn knotted cement rope using air dry clay, I knew I had to do it.

Pottery Barn’s Knotted Cement Rope was priced at $89!

So…. last night while watching TV, I rolled some clay into approximately 1” balls and poked a hole through using a chopstick. This left a big enough hole for some thicker jute rope to go through.

This morning it was dry enough to work with. Theoretically, it would take about 3 days to dry completely, but I have painted air dry clay before it was completely dry in the past so I knew I could. I will still let it air dry now for 3 days before doing anything more with it. I used my aged stone technique to make the clay beads look like they were made of cement. I painted the beads with our Missouri Limestone Painting Company chalk paint in “Gray Goose”. I added some baking soda and kind of pounced it on to give the clay the texture of stone. Once dry, I applied liming wax then wiped excess off.

I knotted mine similar to Pottery Barn but added a tag on one end I had made. I thought it fit perfectly with my cement rope.

I am so pleased with how it turned out!

Creating Aged Stoneware

Relaxing with my crafting. I can truthfully say I am going to be obsessed with white wax for a few days. I started yesterday and have already completed 4 projects.

Project #1 – I updated a duck that already had a lot of detail.

I’ve been seeing many crafters updating vintage ceramic ducks. I bought this one several years ago. I think it was from the ‘80s.

I decided to finally update this one. What a difference a little paint and Briwax Liming Wax makes!

Julie’s Designs and Signs has a great tutorial on painting ducks. I think the ones she painted may even be from the same company, just a different design. I basically followed her tutorial. My paint was different and my wax, but the idea is pretty much the same.

https://youtu.be/MN8eWuiwbNM

I gave the duck two light coats of our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk paint in the color “Trading Post”. I didn’t want heavy coat of paints because I didn’t want to cover up the texture.

First coat
2nd coat

Once both coats were thoroughly dry, I covered the duck in white wax. I use the Briwax brand white wax because I’ve had it forever. It works well.

Once the wax was on and pushed into the details well with a Dollar Store stencil brush I have, I took a soft paper towel and wiped it off.

I love the end result!!

Project #2: Mexican pottery transformed to an aged stone look

After using the Briwax Liming Wax on the duck earlier, I started looking around. I have had this piece of Mexican pottery for a long time. The texture of it was perfect. If it wasn’t, from all the videos I’ve been watching, I could easily add some texture to my paint with baking soda to get the rough look.

By painting this piece with our “Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Gray Goose”, letting it dry, then applying the lining wax by dabbing it into the paint, making sure it got onto the crevices with a stencil brush , then wiping it away carefully, I was able to get this aged stone effect.

I thought I’d try some stamps on it after and they worked great.

I added a few more stamps and this one is going on my dining room table. I’m sure I will be making some more aged stone look vases, even if they once started out as glass jars. 🙂

Project #3: An Aged Stone Look Bird Hook

I just had to do this aged stone look again. I knew this little 3 1/2” w x 5” high bird hook would work as it is a textured resin material.

I love how the dark gray paint and Briwax Liming Wax gave it a bluish tint.

Project #4: A Oui Jar transformed into a little aged stone crock

I’m still playing with Briwax Liming Wax. This time I took a plain Oui yogurt jar and made a utensil holder for some cute dessert “sporks”.

I wondered what dark green under the wax would look like. I loved the color it became.

But first I sprayed the Oui jar with a sealer so the paint would adhere well. I added several teaspoons of baking soda to my Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Evening Shade”, a dark green. The baking soda will make the paint nice and thick and grainy.

I painted and dabbed it on thick this time as I wanted a lot of texture that would be like concrete when finished. I let the first coat dry, then applied the second coat.

Once the jar was thoroughly dry, I added the white wax, then wiped it off. Love, love, love this look.

I added a couple of stamps and filled it with the colorful dessert sporks. 🙂

This turned out so well, it will be available, complete with the “sporks”!

Decoupage a Dollar Tree Makeup Bag

I have been discovering all sorts of things to decoupage. This idea of decoupaging a makeup bag is the latest and greatest.

I ran across this Decoupage Queen’s youtube channel – Joan-Marie Domino. She has many great ideas, but the one I saw and had to try was decoupaging a makeup bag.

I was so inspired when I watched her tutorial. I had just bought 3 makeup bags. I knew I could find an idea on line and Wow! I sure did.

I found three beautiful napkins in my stashe I knew would look beautiful with the pink and gray on the bags. Friends had given me these napkins so I have no idea where they came from originally.

Her makeup bag was canvas. These Dollar Tree bags were kind of a brushed fabric and were plastic lined. Good for makeup that might leak, but…..not for the iron on decoupage she used on hers. I was afraid the hot iron would melt the plastic liners.

So I ended up doing regular decoupage, using Saran Wrap to help me push the napkins down onto the fabric. Here are the steps I used.

Step 1: Buy a makeup bag. These plastic lined makeup bags came from Dollar Tree.

Step 2: Place parchment paper inside just in case the decoupage medium goes through. I didn’t think it would being plastic lined, but didn’t want to take any chances.

Step 3: This step is important, according to Joan-Marie’s tutorial. Make sure you use Fabric Mod Podge. I assume it helps with not only adhering well, but also makes the napkin supple and keeps it from cracking.

I applied one coat of the Fabric Mod Podge over the top area of the bag. DO NOT apply to the zipper area. I let that coat dry well.

Step 4: I then applied a second coat and lay the napkin over it. I used Saran Wrap to help press the napkin (cut a bit longer on all sides) into the fabric. I tried to have a very straight line on the bottom edge of the napkin so that it went right up to the edge of the pink area. I let that coat dry thoroughly.

Step 5: Next, I trimmed the napkin a bit more then used a nail Emory board (sandpaper would work) to get a clean edge on the sides and top.

Step 6: Once dry, I added a second coat of the Mod Podge. Note: It will be tacky after both coats even after fully drying.

Steps 7 and 8: It is now ready for TWO coats of a clear matte water based LIQUID sealer. Make sure you use a liquid and not a spray. Let the first coat dry thoroughly before applying the second. I happened to have some wise owl clear matte one hour enamel, but any clear matte water based sealer will work.

Once dry the bag will no longer be sticky and the napkin will very supple. You can wad it up and smooth it out and it will not crack.

And …. just look at the beautiful makeup bags now!

A Bunny Tin Filled with Flowers and Greenery

I’m at my son Trevor’s helping out with the kids while Lydia is at a conference, but I brought along enough supplies to keep me busy while they are at school. 🙂

I was going to paint a duck today, but instead decided on painting this little 4 1/2” tall by 3 1/2” round embossed galvanized tin. I brought the perfect bunny framed with greenery Prima transfer I bought at The Gray Wall to go on it.

I’m so glad I did! It’s a little overcast today but the lighting seemed perfect when I used their beautiful view as a background for photos.

I usually spray a clear coat on metal or glass first but this tin was not shiny and the Mod Podge sprays I used uusially create a nice hard finish.

I painted the tin with 3 coats of our Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January” and let it dry. Then I gave it a coat of Mod Podge clear matte spray, followed by Mod Podge Pearlized Glaze spray.

I then applied the transfer. I sealed the transfer with another coat of the clear matte spray and a very light coat of the pearlized spray. I didn’t want to use too much as I really wanted the details in the transfer to show up. I just wanted a little shimmer. It’s hard to see on the photos, but it is there.

I love how it turned out and love how the photos show it off!

Lots of Crafting Going On and Today I’m Sharing How I Made This Two-Sided Tin Can Pocket

One pocket – two different looks

I have neglected my blog for awhile, but I have been on a crafting frenzy. I have been posting on my personal Facebook page, though, until I can transfer them here, so at least they aren’t lost. You can do a search for my name, Sharon Sumner if you like to see. Most of my Facebook posts are private, but my crafts are all public. I do not accept Friends on my page, though, unless I know you. I would love for you to follow my SharSum Paint page. I sometimes post them there, too. Facebook.com/sharsumpaint. I do post most of them in my Instagram page also. You can follow along there, too. instagram.com/sharsumpaint

Today, I am sharing how I made this tin can pocket. I’ve been a little obsessed with these. They are just a can from your pantry. You open both ends, smash the bottom and decorate. You can do a Google Search for tin dan pockets and find videos popping up on how to make this. Some use a vise, some a hammer and some just stomp on them. Like this fellow crafter, Junk Gypsy. lol https://www.facebook.com/1646948723/posts/10224724308128875/?d=nu

I’ve decided my goal in life must be to come up with as many ways possible as I can in making these pockets.

It became pretty involved and took awhile, but I so love how it turned out. The steps I took have kind of became a tutorial. I’m pretty wordy so bear with me. 🙂

I had to smash my own can this morning. Danny didn’t have a supply ready for me. 🤷🏼‍♀️ I basically used the idea from Junk Gypsy’s tutorial 😂😂😂 by first stomping on it with my foot, but then I put it on the vise and finally used the hammer to finish it off. Glad Danny wasn’t awake yet to video me.

~ Painting the can


* I first spray the can with an acrylic sealer. This helps chalk paint adhere to metal.
* I then daubed on white chalk paint. This gives an awesome texture I love using on metal and glass.
* When dry, I sprayed the can with Mod Podge Pearlized Spray – this gave it a shimmer. If I didn’t want the shimmer, I would have used Mod Podge clear matte spray.

~ Creating the dragonfly design and Decoupaging the napkin

* I had this awesome dragonfly stamp given to me by awesome friends (formerly known as neighbors Boot Pierce and Rhonda Pierce). So I stamped a plain sheet of napkin (left from peeling off from another napkin project). I wet the sides in a jagged line and tore it. This helps to blend in when decoupaging.
* I used Mod Podge matte finish to decoupage the napkin, applying it to the can and laying the napkin down, then on top, pressing lightly into the ridges and making sure it is smooth. I dry it with a hair dryer, making sure I lightly press with my fingers as I dry it.

~ The other side is Rub on Transfers

* The other side I used the gold rub on transfers from Dollar Tree. These are not perfect and the first sheet I tried was already attached to the sheet that was supposed to come off so I couldn’t use it. The second one was ok, but the details are so delicate it was almost impossible getting it down into the ridges. I ended up just using my fingernail to adhere the butterflies. I ended up liking the distressed look it had so all was well. I then sprayed both sides with the Mod Podge spray again.

~ The hanger

* I didn’t drill holes in the can so I glued the hanger inside. I used wired jute and strung it with white beads. The beads have a shiny ceramic look to them. I’m like the crow who sees something shiny and has to have it. I found a little a couple little mini basketball nets at a thrift store. Net, who cared? Shiny white beads for my stashe? You bet! I cut off all the strings and now have a whole container of shiny white beads ….minus the 20 I used for this project.

~ Embellishments

* I thought ribbon glued on the bottom would be a cool look. On the dragonfly side I even used a few flowers from my flowers I used.
* The flowers are flocked and from Dollar Tree. These are very high end looking and beautiful. I pushed all of them into a small piece of styrofoam and glued them into the styrofoam. Then I just put the whole thing into the can.
* The shiny vinyl butterflies. I’m in love with these 3D butterflies from Dollar Tree. I glued them to skewers and stuck them in. For each side showing, just turn the butterflies around to the front.

And that’s it. This is my 5th tin can pocket…..so far. But who’s counting?🤪

Here are my others. Some are decorated only on one side, others are two sided.

Two sided

A Well Dressed Cheese Box

I found this cheese box (15” round x 5 1/2” tall) when thrifting this summer while on vacation. I knew the glued on flowers had to go, but hadn’t decided how I was going to upcycle it….until today.

It’s getting cold out and that cheese box needed a sweater. I just happened to have a new red sweater that came in an Ugly Sweater kit I thrifted last year.

The first thing I did was sand off those flowers as much as I could and then I cut the sweater in half about 4” below the armpits. Then I covered the outside of the box and down the inside. The lid still fits fine around the sweater.

I glued the seams first, inside, outside, and underneath. Then I glued all around, securing the sweater to the box.

I was left with a lot of fuzz, which was hard to remove on that rough wood. I didn’t want to get out a vacuum, so I used rolled up masking tape to pick it up. It worked like a charm.

Next, I finished the rough edges by gluing sisal rope around the sides and bottom.

And then came the image I downloaded and adapted to cover up the old flowers I had mostly sanded away. This is a technique I’ve used several times now. I found this image, free on The Graphics Fairy Site. I had to do several things to get it the way I wanted, though. First, I had to make the image transparent and I cut it into a round shape using the free app Pro Knockout. But I wanted it to have a more vintage look so I uploaded it to the free website Lunapic and saved it as a pen drawing.

All of this is free, so I’m sharing my image I created here. Please credit The Graphics Fairy and this blog post if you do use it. Thanks.

Pen drawing created in Lunapic.com from a free image found on The Graphics Fairy.

I then inserted the image into a Google Document, enlarged it to fit the paper, and saved it as a pdf file. Next, I used a product called Pixi Spray to temporary adhere a piece of drop cloth to a sheet of printer paper. I trimmed the drop cloth to the size of the paper, then printed it on my personal black and white laser printer.

I am always blown away how cool this look is on drop cloth. I cut around the circle and adhered the image to the box using Elmer’s Craft Bond.

I cut the neck off and used what I learned from the wise words of all mothers, “Don’t pull on the neck of your sweater, you will stretch it out!” They are right! I pulled and pulled and stretched it enough so that it would fit around my image and then hot glued it in place. It is on there forever. 🙂 And while I was at it, I used a red paint pen and colored in the berries on his hat for just a bit of color.

This finished my cheese box. I posted it for sale on my Facebook page and it sold almost immediately!

Now, what to do with the sweater arms?? I’m thinking my early morning project will be dressing a few Oui yogurt jars. 🙂

Birch Tree Risers and Logs

We’ve been making birch tree risers. Leonard Butts, Robin Holmes Butts, and Kathy Strothcamp thanks for the contribution from your fallen trees and limbs. Leonard, your big branch we saved from your tree became the risers, and Kathy, your branches and Leonard and Robin’s smaller branches became the birch log bundle.

Danny cut them into the sizes I wanted and made me hold the saw down while he got the right measurements. Personally, I think he could have done that himself, but the couple that works together, stays together, right? 😂 Plus, I could make sure he was doing it correctly if I helped. 🤪

The resulting projects are all natural and beautiful just as they are. Some have peeling bark, some have bark that peeled off. Some bark may still peel, but that’s what birch trees do.

We made several sets of (1/2”, 1” and 1 1/2”) risers and several sets of (1”, 1/2”, and 2”) risers.

We also made a bundle of 10 birch logs. They fit perfectly on the MCM magazine rack we turned into a log holder.

I researched how bundles of logs are tied for carrying so gave Danny that task after I told him how they did it.

The look on Danny’s face in the first pic says, “Hurry up and take the picture, Pierre. These are freaking heavy.” 😂😂 The second one was a little better after I let him rest his arm. 🤪

The name Pierre is brought up every time there is a photo being taken around here. Ed Pierre was our local photographer for many, many years. He was meticulous with his photography and posing positions and it took forever it seemed until he was satisfied it was the perfect shot. And they always were.

A Decoupaged Wood Slice Tucked into a Fall Arrangement

I was making a couple of coasters with some left over tissue from another project, so I decided to make this to tuck into a fall arrangement I put together. The colors are so rich and vibrant on this tissue paper and I love how it looks in the arrangement!

This is how I did it:

1. I gathered my supplies – off white chalk-style paint, decoupage medium from Dollar Tree, left over tissue paper I made on my ink jet printer, Saran Wrap, a wood slice from Amazon, fine sandpaper, and a hair dryer. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of drying it, just don’t get the hair dryer too close, and I will dry on hot for a bit, then switch to cool a couple of times until dry.

2. I painted the wood slice with one coat of our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk- style paint in “Grannie’s Lace”. The purpose of this is to have a light background showing g through the tissue paper and will make the detail of the image stand out. I used a hair dryer to help speed the drying process.

3. I then gave the wood slice a nice even coat of the decoupage medium from Dollar Tree, making sure it was all covered, all the way to the edge.

4. I carefully placed the tissue paper over the wood slice where I wanted it and then pressed it down and smoothed it out all over with a piece of wadded up Saran Wrap. This allows the tissue paper to adhere smoothly with no wrinkles. Again I used a hair dryer to speed up the drying process.

5. I used a piece of fine sandpaper and went in a downward motion all around the edge to remove excess paper. This keeps the tissue paper from tearing. Do not go back and forth.

6. I then gave it an even coat of of the decoupage medium and used the hair dryer to help speed the drying process. Once dry, I gave it a 2nd coat.

7. The Dollar Tree decoupage medium is glossy and I wanted to tone down the glossiness a bit so once the 2nd coat was thoroughly dry, I sprayed a coat of satin Mod Podge sealer over it.

Note: As an FYI, I have heard that glossy decoupage is much more water resistant than matte or satin, so often people will use the glossy for the first coat and after will tone it down with Matt or satin as I did here.

I now have a beautiful embellishment to tuck into my Fall display.

Storing Faux Flowers – Problem Solved! A baby gate!

Do you struggle with faux flower storage in your craft area? I do!

I’ve tried several things, but nothing was working well. I’ve searched Hoogke and Pinterest. I’ve watched organizational videos and even tried some of them, but nothing worked for me.

Until today. As we were decluttering the basement we came across several baby gates. Since the grands are no longer babies, Danny wanted to know if I wanted to sell them. I’ve really had the flower problem on my mind and all of a sudden, I saw not a baby gate, but a rack with holes that could hang on a wall or door and I could stuff stems through the holes!

We had an over the door hanging rack. I had to leave then so Danny tried it out and it works perfectly with room to spare for more. I can see at a glance what I have (I may reorganize by color 🤪) and it is space saving, too! I even have room for more on this one, plus I have two more gates if I need more room. 🤪

And it looks pretty, too!

An Ear of Harvest Corn Made With Wooden Beads

Today’s early morning project: I created an “Ear of Harvest Corn with Wooden Beads”

I only had enough beads for one ear. I had wire here, but if I do any more I would get copper jewelry wire. I believe the beads came from Dollar General and the raffia is from the hula skirt from Dollar Tree.

This was a fun and quick project and would look great mixed in with your other fall decor. I love the Fall natural look.

There was no need for me to make a tutorial on this, because the tutorial I used from Hammons Nest was excellent and easy to follow.

If you’d like to try this, here’s the Hammons Nest tutorial: https://fb.watch/8thInCI9jQ/