DIY Acorn, Tassel Gnome, a Pumpkin, and Preserved Leaves in a Wooden Bowl

A little Fall inspiration today.

*Saw an idea this morning on YouTube from Liz Fenwick DIY https://youtube.com/channel/UCntvPlLI7oY_xap7_piH5UA for making an acorn. I used a wooden egg, drop cloth, and jute rope from DT. It worked perfectly.

*I just had to make a tassel gnome. I am loving making these. So much fun and each one has a personality. I believe his name might be Woodsy. Here’s the link to the tutorial I used: https://justthatperfectpiece.com/easy-gnome-christmas-ornament-diy/

*Then I painted a little pumpkin so I would have an odd number of items in the bowl.

Loving the neutral look this year…..

A Stenciled Wood Pumpkin Cut Out

Today’s early morning project: I upcycled a 12” wood cut out pumpkin (the one that is orange and says thankful and blessed). I scraped off the glitter and temoved all the embellishments and used the other side.

First I stained it and let it dry. Then I had a silicone sink mat from Dollar Tree and used it as a stencil and sprayed over it with white spray paint. I chose to spray lightly in some areas to give it a distressed look. Love how it turned out.

I made a little tag from some balsa wood and stained it. I saw an idea on a YouTube video to use a piece of burlap, fray the edges and create letters from raffia. That worked great! Then I glued the burlap to the tag. I used the same raffia to hang it from the stem, gluing the down to keep it place, then created a raffia bow.

The cut out already had holes for hanging, so I braided some jute twine, ran it through the holes and tied with knots in the back.

Another neutral hanging pumpkin completed.

This could easily be a door hanger. I am showing it just simply wired on and sitting in the middle of a 20” grapevine wreath. This would need to be on a covered porch, though, away from the elements.

Loving it on my orange wall in my hallway. I think I might have to keep this one. Lol

Paper Bag Pumpkin

Today, I decided to make a paper bag pumpkin and embellish it with a tassel gnome. Read on to see how I did it.

I used a Dollar Tree Orange pumpkin and cut a hole in the top and bottom. I also used approximately 8 paper bags from Dollar Tree. I quit counting and ended up using parts of the strips I made, but I’m sure it wasn’t over 8 bags.

I peeled the bottom of the bag away from the glue and opened the bag up completely. Sometimes it tore a little but that’s ok.

While the bag was open, I cut each bag into 6 strips. The edges I left together and the others I kept in groups of 2 so for each bag I had 12 strips to use.

I then put two strips together, crumpled them up, and then twisted them.

I was then ready to start gluing them to the pumpkin form. I started off by gluing a strip in one of the grooves and stuffing the ends into the holes and gluing them in. I did a few like that and then started filling in as needed.

I won’t lie. This is pretty time consuming, but hang in there. It is worth it in the end. There might be easier ways to do it, but this just worked well for me. I continued on until all the strips were glued on.

I then made a tassel gnome using Walmart cotton twine for the body and jute twine for the hat and a little wood bead for his nose. I used the tutorial below to make my gnome. I made him a little shorter than the tutorial by cutting off some of the strings on the bottom.

https://justthatperfectpiece.com/easy-gnome-christmas-ornament-diy/

I used this gold decorator hook but it was a bit too shiny, so I painted it a light coat of brown and covered it with cinnamon. I let it dry then sealed it with Mod Podge satin spray sealer.

I added a screw to the hook, put some super glue around the screw and the edge of the hook bottom and pushed it into the pumpkin.

I tied some raffia together and tied my gnome to it, then with another piece of jute, tied all to the hook. I then added a couple of little wood leaves I already had.

I had a small parquet wooden bowl so I turned it upside to display my finished pumpkin. I did not attach the pumpkin to the bottom of the bowl. It can then be used for other things.

And…then….my paper bag pumpkin was complete!

Pottery Barn Inspired Metallic Gold Cloche and Pot

I decided I would go shopping in my basement this morning. I found some treasures, so I created a little cloche covering a pot of flowers.

1) I had a shade from a fan light. The beveled glass in it is beautiful. I left it metallic gold because I’ve been seeing metallic gold trending lately.

2) I also had this little white tea light holder so I gave it a little metallic gold paint here and there (just like Pottery Barn would) and added a few faux flowers.

3) I had a plastic lid that fit perfectly on the shade, but it was white, so I painted it a metallic gold to match.

4) The lid needed a knob to lift the cloche, so I found the perfect knob in my collection that coordinated with the flowers. I super glued it to the lid then super glued the lid to the shade.

And there you have it…my Pottery Barn inspired cloche and pot. Place the cloche over the pot of flowers, or if you don’t want to display flowers, just remove them and add a battery operated tea light or votive. I wouldn’t use a real candle since this is enclosed and the lid is a plastic.

Decoupage Napkins in a Faux Galvanized Tin Holder

Here are the steps I took to create the coasters:

1. I purchased these stone tiles as part of a package at Home Depot. I cleaned the them thoroughly.

2. I usually paint the tops and sides with our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint in “January” as white paint will really help the print stand out. But these coasters were already white on one side so I skipped this step.

3. I chose areas of the napkin that would look good centered on the tiles and cut them a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part. Sometimes napkins will only have one white layer.

4. For the decoupage medium, I used Mod Podge on this set. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a piece of plastic wrap to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.this plastic wrap helps to keep the napkin from sticking to my fingers.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

I used a painting technique to create a faux galvanized tin look to a plain black coaster holder.

You can see how I did this technique in another blog post, found here.

I enjoyed doing this technique so much I have used it on a variety of items.

Paint a Pair of Leather Shoes in Less Than an Hour

I am not a newbie when it comes to painting shoes with chalk-style paint, specifically the brand we own and produce “Missouri Limestone Paint Company”. I’ve painted shoes made of quality leather as well as those that are from cheap man-made materials. Then I’ve worn the heck out of them. This latest pair I painted two coats and applied two coats of salve – all in less than an hour.

Oh my! These look ready for the trash! But they are so comfortable! Especially when I’m on my feet painting, apparently. Lol
But no more painting in this beautiful pair of shoes! They look brand new, don’t they?

Would you like to know how I did it? First, a sneak peek to see the transformation in progress.

I started out by cleaning the shoes well with Windex. This is my go to cleaner for many things I paint.

All the added color on this pair is from our chalk-style paint. This paint is on there for good, trust me. Cleaning didn’t remove it, nor could I scratch it off. I didn’t want to sand it or use chemicals on it, so…. I painted over it. 😏

Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint Color: Gray Goose
I painted the elastic on the strap, too.
I even painted the soles!

I also know from experience, our paint does very well on rubber. I painted a Rubbermaid mailbox several years ago….no sealer….and it still looks brand new today. So, I also painted the soles of this pair of shoes, but did not seal them.

Needs a second coat of paint

I painted the first coat. It dried quickly, but so also helped it along with a hair dryer. You can see the reddish look coming through along with the spots from the original paint splatters. But look! No brush strokes! Our paint (when applied in thin coats), does not leave brush strokes.

2nd coat covered well

It is time to apply the salve. I love Wise Owl Salve and keep it on hand for projects like this.

Can you tell which shoe has had the Wise Owl Salve applied? If you said the left one, you are correct!

As you can see, I applied the Wise Owl salve on the left shoe so you can see what a difference it makes.

Wow, right?

I applied the first coat of salve and buffed it. Then, I applied a light second coat and just rubbed it in, but did not buff. Remember, I DID NOT use the salve on the soles.

And there you have it! Another pair of shoes given a new life. I promise not to paint in these! I will periodically apply another coat of salve and buff it in.

A Faux Galvanized Tin Hanging Pendant Light

https://sharsumpaint.com/2020/08/06/a-faux-galvanized-tin-hanging-pendant-light/

I found a great tutorial for creating faux galvanized tin using paint. I repurposed this brass plated hanging pendant light and it looks like the real thing.

The tutorial shows it on a cardboard box. Since I was painting on metal, I used a spray primer first.

https://shellyhickox.blogspot.com/2015/04/decoart-media-faux-galvanized-canisters.html?m=1

This is what I did:

1. Took the light apart and scuffed up the pieces. Cleaned well.

2. Sprayed all pieces with primer.

3. Painted with Metallic Silver waterbased paint. I put a small amount in plastic cup and painted out of it. I even painted the cord.

4. Added a little Medium gray color chalk-style paint to the metallic, stirred it in, and using a piece of natural sponge, I dabbed it on each piece. I used our brand we own and produce: Missouri Limestone Paint Company.

5. Then I added a little white and dabbed again all over.

6. Then I added some black and dabbed again.

7. Finished by dabbing a little silver metallic with a brush, making sure there wasn’t much paint on the brush.

8. Sealed with Wise Owl Salve.

The Best Black/Dark Wax over Chalk Paint Tutorial Ever! by Jan Brown Kissick

janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep7janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep27I love finding great tutorials to help me with techniques I want to learn while painting with chalk-based paints.  Sometimes you find that perfect one and think…..where was that tutorial when I needed it?? Like that time when I didn’t know what I was doing applying dark wax to a green cabinet and it turned out looking like camouflage. Raise your hand if you know what I mean.

Well, wonder no more on how to apply dark wax.  This tutorial by Jan will provide you with clear step-by-step instructions that you will want to save. Trust me…..it is good!

First of all I want to make it very clear this was not written by me.  I make camouflage pieces, remember?  This excellent tutorial was written by Jan Brown Kissick who has kindly given me permission to use her photos and her words to share this with all of you.

Jan wrote this tutorial in a post for a chalk painting Facebook group I belong to called Chalk Paint, Distress and Decoupage.  Good info here.  If you’d like to join, here’s the link:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/Chalkpaint101/

I will stop rambling now and share Jan’s tutorial in her own words.

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Steps I Do for a Black/Dark Wax Tutorial by Jan Brown Kissick

Ok someone has asked me to show the steps I do for black/dark wax. {EDITED: following Steps are for when using a darker color of paint and only based off of my experience with Annie Sloan products! Use clear wax first on lighter paint colors–immediately–do not let sit before starting your dark/black wax!} I’ll state that I’m definitely not a pro but I’m not brand new either. I’ve learned a lot of lessons the hard way and I’m sure there’s still more to learn! Hope this helps you all! There are captions with each picture.

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1. Set up old movie on your tablet for entertainment I get tired of music so like listening to (love Audrey H!) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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2. 1 paper plate for clear wax, 1 for black/dark Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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3. spoonful of clear wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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4. Spoonful of black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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5. Cut down cheap chip brush –load with black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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6. Scott shop towels Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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7. 2 coats of paint fully dried AS Emperors Silk. Anyone else hearing clown 🤡 music? I don’t like this red without black wax. If you do great! It’s just not me. So let’s add black wax. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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8. Brushing on black wax in small sections-(only doing black first bc it’s a darker pigment paint color. If yours is light, then start with clear. Recommend trying small spot to see how black wax first works for you and follow remaining steps) Photos by Jan Brown Kissick

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9. Looks like crap right? 💩🤣 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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10. Tear off towel and fold into fourths ( or whatever’s comfortable for you) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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11. Wipe off wax as much as possible turn over cloth often,otherwise you will just put wax back on. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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12. Now get clear wax on new section of towel or get new towel. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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13. Not a whole lot but make sure you get some! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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14.  I “dab” the clear wax on  Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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15. Then wipe it off. Remember to turn cloth over often!! Or will create “bare spots” Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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16. Keep wiping, adding more clear wax until blended well. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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17. Blended! (Top of arm) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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18. Applied the black wax… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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19. Blended! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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20. 😳😳are you scared??? This is when you panic right???😳😳😳 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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21. It will be okay! Keep adding clear, keep blending, remember to turn that cloth over and get new cloth! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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22. Blending… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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23. Okay…maybe there’s hope… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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24. Not worrying about that bottom too much. Will have a cushion over it. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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25. Look at that leg! 😎😎 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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26. Ta-da!!! Done!!!! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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27. Happy!! 😍😍😍 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

Some addtional comments from Jan after questions on group post:

  •  If using a light color do clear wax first. If using a large surface like a table, buffet, dresser I use a wax brush for the clear to apply but always blend with cloth. Don’t want to get dark wax on your clear wax brush.
  • clear wax–if only using clear–the technique is different. Just making sure I clarify that.
  • On lighter colors…yes do clear first. Colors with more pigment should be fine with black first. Try it first as I suppose it will depend on your piece. Hope it works for you as It will save you wax!
  • want to make sure not misleading people into thinking you don’t need to do clear wax first–you will on lighter colors! Also this is only for Annie Sloan’s products. I’ve used other products in the past and I never had much luck with them. Not sure they will work the same. Thanks everyone for the great feedback. My first tutorial so I’m learning how to do this too! Next time I make up a glaze with dark wax I’ll do one for that.
  • And do small sections. Don’t let the first layer of clear dry! Right after clear, then add black, do it immediately, then add the clear.
  • wanted to add that you can break after a section, just don’t stop in the middle of the section. Hope that makes sense. In other words I did half the chair last night and half today.
  •  if you’re going to do dark/black wax too then do all at once in sections. You can stop and pause between sections but don’t pause within a section. You don’t want the black/clear to dry too much. I do sometimes come back the next day and still wipe it down again with more clear if I find streaks–it’s possible–I just say don’t stop mid-section as a rule.
  • And I do always buff pieces next day regardless if just clear or a mixture. Gets off the residue and makes them shine!
  • the wax will harden and no longer be tacky when it’s sealed. I have pieces I’ve spilled coffee with no damage and my dog threw up on a table 🤢 and it cleaned right up. No signs of any of it.
  •  I’ll do a tutorial for my next dark wax that is more of a glaze technique.

I don’t know about you, but I’m looking forward to Jan’s next tutorial!  Fingers crossed she will let me share it here, too!