Beautiful Lanterns from Light Covers from the 80s

Remember these? I love the beveled glass panels!

Our neighbors gifted these to us along with the fan/light fixture, another fan, and the fan blades for both. You’ll have to check out what I did with some of the fan blades already!

I have made two lanterns so far.

The first one I decorated for Christmas. I wanted a top for it and found a bell ornament that worked perfectly. I painted the light cover to match the bell. I used a candle plate with faux snow glued to it. I “planted” 3 trees to represent a Christmas tree farm and added a little red truck ornament and a tea light with a 6 hour timer.

Once the lantern was in place, I added the red berry garland.

I went Shabby Chic with the second one. I was stumped on how to make a lid for this one. But then I noticed one of my cans of spray sealer would work if I cut it down. I did that and painted it inside and out with our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company in Vintage Linen and added a prism cut drawer pull.

I glued the lid to the top of the cover with hot glue and E6000 and used metallic aged brass wax to distress.

I also painted a small mirror, distressed it with sandpaper and added a touch of the metallic aged brass wax.

The lantern sits over a hydrangea bloom I dried and a tea light with a 6 hour timer.

Very elegant!

Now, to think up another lantern or two or three to make. 😁

A Fall Dollar Tree Door Mat

I’ve been seeing the Dollar Tree Felt Pumpkins, Leaves, and Acorns used as stencils on the Dollar Tree gray door mats. This morning, I used the leaf one to create this beautiful door mat. You can do it, too!

Yes, I made that cute little fall gnome door hanger, too.

These are the materials I used. I used our paint brand we own and produce, Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint: Grannies Lace, Old Tin Barn, Bordeaux, English Ivy, and Possum Grape Jam. However, any brand and type of paint should do fine.

I used the side that was more ribbed. On my next one I will use the flatter side. This mat really soaks up the paint. This is the first coat. I eventually did two coats and then a little more to cover well the area that will be under the leaf stencil. The rest can have a more dry brush look.

I then placed the stencil on the mat and just started pounding the Old Tin Barn color on the spines and all around the leaf. You don’t have to do the whole thing at this point. I just did around the leaf area then removed the leaf stencil.

I then continued pouncing the Old Tin Barn color all around.

Using the same brush, without washing it out, I pounced the Bordeaux color on randomly over the Old Tin Barn, trying to blend it a bit.

Using the same brush again, I pounced on randomly the English Ivy color.

Using the same process, I added a bit of Possum Grape Jam color.

This photo shows all the different colors, much like you would see in nature in the fall.

The last step is to take the mat outside and give it a couple coats of the SPAR Urethane waterbased exterior sealer. It says it is gloss, but doesn’t show up gloss on the mat. I don’t think, once chalk-style paint cures for 30 days, a sealer is really needed, but in the meantime I think it just helps protect it a little.

And there it is! A beautiful Fall door mat. The pumpkin and acorn would also look nice.

And here’s my acorn one. I’m keeping this one. It’s pretty appropriate since we have a ton of oak trees (not to mention leaves) in our yard.

Paint a Pair of Leather Shoes in Less Than an Hour

I am not a newbie when it comes to painting shoes with chalk-style paint, specifically the brand we own and produce “Missouri Limestone Paint Company”. I’ve painted shoes made of quality leather as well as those that are from cheap man-made materials. Then I’ve worn the heck out of them. This latest pair I painted two coats and applied two coats of salve – all in less than an hour.

Oh my! These look ready for the trash! But they are so comfortable! Especially when I’m on my feet painting, apparently. Lol
But no more painting in this beautiful pair of shoes! They look brand new, don’t they?

Would you like to know how I did it? First, a sneak peek to see the transformation in progress.

I started out by cleaning the shoes well with Windex. This is my go to cleaner for many things I paint.

All the added color on this pair is from our chalk-style paint. This paint is on there for good, trust me. Cleaning didn’t remove it, nor could I scratch it off. I didn’t want to sand it or use chemicals on it, so…. I painted over it. 😏

Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint Color: Gray Goose
I painted the elastic on the strap, too.
I even painted the soles!

I also know from experience, our paint does very well on rubber. I painted a Rubbermaid mailbox several years ago….no sealer….and it still looks brand new today. So, I also painted the soles of this pair of shoes, but did not seal them.

Needs a second coat of paint

I painted the first coat. It dried quickly, but so also helped it along with a hair dryer. You can see the reddish look coming through along with the spots from the original paint splatters. But look! No brush strokes! Our paint (when applied in thin coats), does not leave brush strokes.

2nd coat covered well

It is time to apply the salve. I love Wise Owl Salve and keep it on hand for projects like this.

Can you tell which shoe has had the Wise Owl Salve applied? If you said the left one, you are correct!

As you can see, I applied the Wise Owl salve on the left shoe so you can see what a difference it makes.

Wow, right?

I applied the first coat of salve and buffed it. Then, I applied a light second coat and just rubbed it in, but did not buff. Remember, I DID NOT use the salve on the soles.

And there you have it! Another pair of shoes given a new life. I promise not to paint in these! I will periodically apply another coat of salve and buff it in.

Restoration Hardware Look? Yes, Please! A Driftwood/Old Barn Wood Technique for Wood

My husband and I (SharSum Paint) are distributors of a brand of chalk-based paint out of Ozark, Missouri, called Missouri Limestone Paint Company.  Even better, we personally use the paint we sell and, through our business, teach classes to others on how to use it.  As a result, I’m always on the lookout for different techniques to try out and share with others.

Yesterday, I was on Pinterest, naturally.  I came across a tutorial on creating a driftwood/barn wood effect.  What was really interesting was how the author referenced the final result being reminiscent of “Restoration Hardware” furniture.  I had to learn more!

Old barn wood is all the rage right now. Here’s the excellent tutorial showing the method they used and was what gave me the inspiration to try my own version: http://cececaldwells.com/barnwood/

Of course, I took a little liberty with the tutorial and substituted our paint brand ( we all have our favorite brands, right?) and changed it from using a stain/sealer to using liming wax mainly because I wanted to try out liming wax. varathanewaterbasedstainsealer If I were going to do this on something like a kitchen table, I might use the method in the tutorial, or possible do the wash, then the drybrush, making sure to blend it in, then seal it with stain/sealer as the final step. I will try to get a sample using stain/sealer later.

I couldn’t wait to try this so this morning bright and early, I got started. Of course, I didn’t take a before pic of my piece of wood, but it was a new piece of pine, I believe….light in color. Anyway, it had some good grain in it. I also looked at the tutorial again and noticed there were quite a few steps listed to get the result of driftwood/barn wood…..the restoration hardware look. 1. gray paint wash 2. stain/sealer 3. dry brush white and 4. seal again. I decided I could create that look in 2 steps…(The older generation reading this might find this statement reminiscent of “I can name that tune in 2 notes”!)  : )

I remembered that liming wax will give the whitewash effect the dry brushing does. I also wanted to use wax rather than a sealer.  What is liming wax? It is basically a white wax – a clear wax with an added white pigment that gives a white grained finish, a white washed faded effect to your bare or stained wood or painted furniture. Liming works best on either open grained wood such as oak, pine or ash but is also beautiful on ornately carved furniture where the white wax will settle in the crevices and give a soft worn look (like antiquing with dark wax but cleaner and more gentle). Originally, lime was used for this technique, which is pretty caustic. Using a white wax will give you a similar look but it is safe to use  and at the same time will also protect your furniture and make it smooth to touch. What is even better is you don’t have to buy liming wax. You can make your own. I used the Briwax toulene-free clear wax we carry at a local store in Sullivan, Missouri as well as at our other locations in Bourbon, Cuba, and Rolla. I added a little Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January’, just eye-balling the amount…..I would say maybe 3 parts wax to 1 part January to start, and then stirred it up. It looked nice and white after stirring. Briwax is so easy to apply and buff. Not much elbow grease is needed at all. It does have a chemical smell, however, so I would make sure to work in a well ventilated area.

Here are the steps I used.  The finished result is below although the picture doesn’t show how truly beautiful the board is after this technique.

1. I poured a small amount of Missouri Limestone paint Company “Gray Goose”
into a small cup. I had another small cup of water. I dipped the brush into the Gray Goose paint, then dipped it in the water. I applied this thinned down paint to the whole board, adding more paint and dipped water as needed to cover. I let that sit for a few minutes, then wiped it off lightly with a wet cloth (I use baby wipes – they work great). I let that dry and then reapplied. The two coats is what darkened the wood more and then I didn’t need a stain.  I also didn’t need a poly sealer as I wanted to use wax to seal.

2. Then came the liming wax I made (see above). I did apply it with a round brush, really working it into the grain of the wood. I let it sit about 30 minutes or so and then buffed it out. I did two applications of this as well.

That’s it! Only two steps!   On a piece of furniture, I would go ahead and do one or two more coats of clear Briwax  for more durability.  Watch this site soon for a “Restoration Hardware” type piece of furniture I will be painting using this technique.

Here’s a photo of my finished board.  The photo, though, does reflect how truly beautiful this technique is.

driftwoodtechnique

Here are some picture frames.  They were raw oak.

But wait!  There’s more!  Here is my first finished piece – The Restoration Hardware Look – already sold!  I am 100% in love with this look.

Stay tuned for a post on my version of this technique using a stain/sealer.