Creating a Color Portfolio of Work on Pinterest

Note:  To make it easy for you to follow the directions below in print, I created an eBook for you.  Just click on this link to download.  Be sure to follow my blog if this is something you  can use.  I would appreciate it.

Free eBook: Pinterest Colors Board Tutorial

I found Pinterest to be an excellent way to showcase my painted projects.  If you enjoy this tutorial or just enjoy looking at painted furniture and home decor, please consider following me on Pinterest.  https://pinterest.com/sharsumpaint  And if you like seeing tutorials like this, please follow this blog.  I have many tutorials listed here.  Just click on the category Tutorials to see them all.  I add new ones periodically.  Thank you.

I’ve been working on creating portfolios of my work through various platforms:  Pinterest, Facebook, and eventually here on my blog.  This is something I’ve attempted in the past and it is a lot of work. I realize now I have created quite a few projects and have the images saved in several different places and finding them all, saving in one place, adding descriptions, etc is all going to take time.

However, I am highly motivated right now to get this done.  Why?  I am doing more custom work with my business and I want an easy way to share examples of my work along with colors and techniques to hopefully, future clients.  So, I am creating color albums.  I started with Facebook and have quite a few ready to go with it, but last night I got distracted (lol happens often) with checking out how to go about it in Pinterest and Wow!  I love what I discovered.  The only drawback is that the client will need to have a Pinterest account, but these days, most people do.

Note:  These directions are for the Pinterest app.  But if working on a computer, they are basically the same.

Steps for Creating a Color Portfolio in Pinterest:

1.  I logged into my business account in Pinterest.  Click on the Plus Sign at the top of the page.pinterestlogin2.  Type in Colors for the Board name and click Create. After it is created, you can click Edit and add a description of your Colors Board.  Here’s mine:  “Portfolio of SharSum Paint’s Work”

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3.  I then clicked on Add Section, gave it a Color name and clicked Next.
Add a Section

 

4.  You may or may not get this message.  If you do, just click Skip at the top right.  I think I got it as I already had boards on my account.

Skip This

5.  You are now ready to add pins to your Brown Section.  Click on the left arrow until you get back to your main page and click on the + sign there.

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6.  You will now add a pin.  This can be from a photo on your phone, a copied link, or a website.  I think it is best to use a photo from your phone.  You will see the photos from your phone.  Click on the brown photo you want to add.  (note:  my brown is not in this screenshot as there was a selfie of me beside it and I didn’t want it on here, but you get the idea.  LOL)Photos from Phone

7.  Your brown photo will show up.  You will want to add a description of your photo at this point.  You will then Click on Choose Board.  You will Choose the Colors and then it will ask you to choose a Section.  You will choose Brown Board.  Then click Done.  Or you may be at the point where you have a photo pin to add that doesn’t have a color section.  At this point, you can choose that photo and choose Create a new Section and add your pin to it.  Bonus:  When you click on a Pin to view it, if you scroll to the bottom, Pinterest adds additional pins that relate to the pin you added.  Pretty cool!

 

8.  You can add a link now.  But to do that you have to edit your pin.  The spot for a link doesn’t show up when you are creating the pin.  So click edit and add the link you’d like visitors to go to.  Be sure to click Save.

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I have found a very cool link that I use with Instagram and other places that only allows you one link.  It is called linktr.ee  It is free and you can sign up through Instagram.  I add all my business links to it.  I found you can even copy a link of the Colors Board in Pinterest, so I added that, too.  Kind of a one stop shop of all my business links and a way to contact me.  It is perfect for Instagram.  Here’s mine:  https://linktr.ee/sharsumpaint 

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9.  You are now ready to add a new pin or see your color board.  Just go back to the main screen again and click on Colors to see all your Color Boards or click on the + sign to add a new pin.

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10.  Click on Colors and you will see all your Color Boards

ColorsBoard

That’s it!  I hope you enjoy creating a Color Portfolio in Pinterest to showcase your work as much as I did.  If you create one, please share below!  I love looking at other artists’ painted projects.

 

 

 

 

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Restoration Hardware Look? Yes, Please! A Driftwood/Old Barn Wood Technique for Wood

My husband and I (SharSum Paint) are distributors of a brand of chalk-based paint out of Ozark, Missouri, called Missouri Limestone Paint Company.  Even better, we personally use the paint we sell and, through our business, teach classes to others on how to use it.  As a result, I’m always on the lookout for different techniques to try out and share with others.

Yesterday, I was on Pinterest, naturally.  I came across a tutorial on creating a driftwood/barn wood effect.  What was really interesting was how the author referenced the final result being reminiscent of “Restoration Hardware” furniture.  I had to learn more!

Old barn wood is all the rage right now. Here’s the excellent tutorial showing the method they used and was what gave me the inspiration to try my own version: http://cececaldwells.com/barnwood/

Of course, I took a little liberty with the tutorial and substituted our paint brand ( we all have our favorite brands, right?) and changed it from using a stain/sealer to using liming wax mainly because I wanted to try out liming wax. varathanewaterbasedstainsealer If I were going to do this on something like a kitchen table, I might use the method in the tutorial, or possible do the wash, then the drybrush, making sure to blend it in, then seal it with stain/sealer as the final step. I will try to get a sample using stain/sealer later.

I couldn’t wait to try this so this morning bright and early, I got started. Of course, I didn’t take a before pic of my piece of wood, but it was a new piece of pine, I believe….light in color. Anyway, it had some good grain in it. I also looked at the tutorial again and noticed there were quite a few steps listed to get the result of driftwood/barn wood…..the restoration hardware look. 1. gray paint wash 2. stain/sealer 3. dry brush white and 4. seal again. I decided I could create that look in 2 steps…(The older generation reading this might find this statement reminiscent of “I can name that tune in 2 notes”!)  : )

I remembered that liming wax will give the whitewash effect the dry brushing does. I also wanted to use wax rather than a sealer.  What is liming wax? It is basically a white wax – a clear wax with an added white pigment that gives a white grained finish, a white washed faded effect to your bare or stained wood or painted furniture. Liming works best on either open grained wood such as oak, pine or ash but is also beautiful on ornately carved furniture where the white wax will settle in the crevices and give a soft worn look (like antiquing with dark wax but cleaner and more gentle). Originally, lime was used for this technique, which is pretty caustic. Using a white wax will give you a similar look but it is safe to use  and at the same time will also protect your furniture and make it smooth to touch. What is even better is you don’t have to buy liming wax. You can make your own. I used the Briwax toulene-free clear wax we carry at a local store in Sullivan, Missouri as well as at our other locations in Bourbon, Cuba, and Rolla. I added a little Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January’, just eye-balling the amount…..I would say maybe 3 parts wax to 1 part January to start, and then stirred it up. It looked nice and white after stirring. Briwax is so easy to apply and buff. Not much elbow grease is needed at all. It does have a chemical smell, however, so I would make sure to work in a well ventilated area.

Here are the steps I used.  The finished result is below although the picture doesn’t show how truly beautiful the board is after this technique.

1. I poured a small amount of Missouri Limestone paint Company “Gray Goose”
into a small cup. I had another small cup of water. I dipped the brush into the Gray Goose paint, then dipped it in the water. I applied this thinned down paint to the whole board, adding more paint and dipped water as needed to cover. I let that sit for a few minutes, then wiped it off lightly with a wet cloth (I use baby wipes – they work great). I let that dry and then reapplied. The two coats is what darkened the wood more and then I didn’t need a stain.  I also didn’t need a poly sealer as I wanted to use wax to seal.

2. Then came the liming wax I made (see above). I did apply it with a round brush, really working it into the grain of the wood. I let it sit about 30 minutes or so and then buffed it out. I did two applications of this as well.

That’s it! Only two steps!   On a piece of furniture, I would go ahead and do one or two more coats of clear Briwax  for more durability.  Watch this site soon for a “Restoration Hardware” type piece of furniture I will be painting using this technique.

Here’s a photo of my finished board.  The photo, though, does reflect how truly beautiful this technique is.

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Here are some picture frames.  They were raw oak.

But wait!  There’s more!  Here is my first finished piece – The Restoration Hardware Look – already sold!  I am 100% in love with this look.

Stay tuned for a post on my version of this technique using a stain/sealer.