Gray Weathered Wood Nesting Tables

I have been searching for a good way to create a gray weathered wood look for a table top ever since I saw my cousin’s new dining room table. I was sure I could paint something similar.

These nesting tables had been waiting patiently for me to work the gray weathered wood magic on them. The time was now.

I came across a tutorial from Angela Marie Made which showed the look I was going for so I pinned it and waited for the right time to try it. Thank you so much for sharing this technique!

First up, the legs – the tables are well made – solid wood with metal inserts for the legs to screw into. I’m sure there is a furniture term for that but I do not know what that is. Just know the legs easily screw on and off with no worries. We cleaned, hand sanded, then cleaned again and they were ready for paint.

My original idea was to paint the legs a light gray, but once I painted one with a new custom color “MO Graystone” we created in our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint line, I knew it would be too light. So I started dry brushing “Sunday Silver” over the lighter gray, lightly in the detail areas and heavier on the rest! I used just a small amount of paint, dabbing most paint on the brush on paper towel first. This is a great way to distress without sanding and it was fun to watch it happen.

Two down, 10 to go!

Love this distressing technique

Table tops: My husband cleaned, sanded, and cleaned again (top and bottom) and I used Varathane Premium Fast dry stain in Kona. I stained the bottoms for a finished look but did not do the weathered wood finish on them. I thought that Kona would darken them a lot, but actually didn’t. The wood is a very hard wood so I probably could have given them another couple of coats, but I lack patience in waiting for oil stain to dry so I chose to do just one coat.

I watered down the “January” color 50/50 and painted it on, then wiped off excess and rubbed in what was left. I could tell it was going to be lighter so I also used a little “Sunday Silver” here and there and rubbed it in. Yes, it turned out lighter than my inspiration, but I love how it turned out.

Love when the furniture decides how a technique is going to look.

I put five coats of Varathane water based Crystal Clear polyurethane Satin on each table, sanding lightly between coats. I love the satin finish!

Now that I’ve experienced how nice this technique is, my plans are to use this finish on this farm table set I have to paint and sell. But that’s a project for another day.

Bringing a Garden Bench Back to Life!

This garden bench had good bones. It just needed some paint and the boards refreshed and I knew just the way to do it.

First of all – the paint. Our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint is perfect for the cast iron metal on this bench. It actually only took one coat of our gorgeous dark green color called “Evening Shade”. It also needed no sealer. Our chalk-style paint, when used on metals like this, cure naturally with the heat and the sun baking it in.

Yes, we ship!!! You can purchase all of our 45 colors in 16 oz. jars through our online distributor, Connie Mathews of Winston Home Designs.

The whole project took less than two hours, even when you have a cute little helper. 🙂

Next – the wood. The wood was in really good shape, just bleached out and dry. Wise Owl Salve in White Tea scent to the rescue! We don’t sell this product ourselves, but I love it and have used it to rehydrate wood and as a sealer on several projects. It comes in several wonderful scents! I purchase mine through a fellow painter in Massachusetts. I was fortunate to meet Sarah, of the Princess and the Peacock, while on a trip to visit my cousin, who lives about 30 minutes from her shop! I’ve linked her name to the Wise Owl Salve section of her online shop.

I tried to show in the photo below the difference the Salve makes in bringing the wood back to life!

The Salve is so easy to apply, then let it soak it, and buff. And Yes, you can use it on furniture left out in the weather, and we do have some weather here in Missouri. The bench may need a reapplication of wax down the road, but it only takes a few minutes so that isn’t a problem.

And that is all there was to it. This bench now looks almost brand new and holds a prominent spot in my front yard under the trees.

Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.

A Wax Resist Tutorial – Using Chalk-Based Paint and Furniture Wax

I have probably said it before, but I’m saying it again.  I LOVE playing with techniques and color on the 1970’s style plastic furniture.  I have been buying up wall vase sconces and wall candle holder sconces and trying out different techniques.  This is going to help me decide how to paint some solid wood furniture I have with the plastic fronts. These pieces are gorgeous when painted.

The technique I used on this set of wall sconces is a wax resist using the paint we sell, Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint.  Any chalk-based paint should work just as well.  Any furniture wax should work fine also. I used Annie Sloan clear wax mixed with gray paint just because I had it on hand.  Otherwise, I would have used just clear.  You can wait until it is fully dry (about 24 hours) and give it a light coat of wax and polish.  Just don’t rub too hard.

The wax resist, on these sconces, produces an old world layered effect that is just beautiful.  I used 4 colors. over the original gold of the plastic piece, “January” (a pure white), “Sunday Silver” (a medium gray), “Arlington Blue” (a medium blue), and “English Bluebells” (a light blue).

View the Tutorial Here:  https://youtu.be/pcmhZ5Ydb64 

Photos from the tutorial: 

 

 

The Best Black/Dark Wax over Chalk Paint Tutorial Ever! by Jan Brown Kissick

janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep7janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep27I love finding great tutorials to help me with techniques I want to learn while painting with chalk-based paints.  Sometimes you find that perfect one and think…..where was that tutorial when I needed it?? Like that time when I didn’t know what I was doing applying dark wax to a green cabinet and it turned out looking like camouflage. Raise your hand if you know what I mean.

Well, wonder no more on how to apply dark wax.  This tutorial by Jan will provide you with clear step-by-step instructions that you will want to save. Trust me…..it is good!

First of all I want to make it very clear this was not written by me.  I make camouflage pieces, remember?  This excellent tutorial was written by Jan Brown Kissick who has kindly given me permission to use her photos and her words to share this with all of you.

Jan wrote this tutorial in a post for a chalk painting Facebook group I belong to called Chalk Paint, Distress and Decoupage.  Good info here.  If you’d like to join, here’s the link:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/Chalkpaint101/

I will stop rambling now and share Jan’s tutorial in her own words.

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Steps I Do for a Black/Dark Wax Tutorial by Jan Brown Kissick

Ok someone has asked me to show the steps I do for black/dark wax. {EDITED: following Steps are for when using a darker color of paint and only based off of my experience with Annie Sloan products! Use clear wax first on lighter paint colors–immediately–do not let sit before starting your dark/black wax!} I’ll state that I’m definitely not a pro but I’m not brand new either. I’ve learned a lot of lessons the hard way and I’m sure there’s still more to learn! Hope this helps you all! There are captions with each picture.

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1. Set up old movie on your tablet for entertainment I get tired of music so like listening to (love Audrey H!) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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2. 1 paper plate for clear wax, 1 for black/dark Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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3. spoonful of clear wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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4. Spoonful of black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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5. Cut down cheap chip brush –load with black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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6. Scott shop towels Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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7. 2 coats of paint fully dried AS Emperors Silk. Anyone else hearing clown 🤡 music? I don’t like this red without black wax. If you do great! It’s just not me. So let’s add black wax. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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8. Brushing on black wax in small sections-(only doing black first bc it’s a darker pigment paint color. If yours is light, then start with clear. Recommend trying small spot to see how black wax first works for you and follow remaining steps) Photos by Jan Brown Kissick

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9. Looks like crap right? 💩🤣 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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10. Tear off towel and fold into fourths ( or whatever’s comfortable for you) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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11. Wipe off wax as much as possible turn over cloth often,otherwise you will just put wax back on. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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12. Now get clear wax on new section of towel or get new towel. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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13. Not a whole lot but make sure you get some! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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14.  I “dab” the clear wax on  Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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15. Then wipe it off. Remember to turn cloth over often!! Or will create “bare spots” Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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16. Keep wiping, adding more clear wax until blended well. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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17. Blended! (Top of arm) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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18. Applied the black wax… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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19. Blended! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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20. 😳😳are you scared??? This is when you panic right???😳😳😳 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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21. It will be okay! Keep adding clear, keep blending, remember to turn that cloth over and get new cloth! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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22. Blending… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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23. Okay…maybe there’s hope… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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24. Not worrying about that bottom too much. Will have a cushion over it. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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25. Look at that leg! 😎😎 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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26. Ta-da!!! Done!!!! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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27. Happy!! 😍😍😍 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

Some addtional comments from Jan after questions on group post:

  •  If using a light color do clear wax first. If using a large surface like a table, buffet, dresser I use a wax brush for the clear to apply but always blend with cloth. Don’t want to get dark wax on your clear wax brush.
  • clear wax–if only using clear–the technique is different. Just making sure I clarify that.
  • On lighter colors…yes do clear first. Colors with more pigment should be fine with black first. Try it first as I suppose it will depend on your piece. Hope it works for you as It will save you wax!
  • want to make sure not misleading people into thinking you don’t need to do clear wax first–you will on lighter colors! Also this is only for Annie Sloan’s products. I’ve used other products in the past and I never had much luck with them. Not sure they will work the same. Thanks everyone for the great feedback. My first tutorial so I’m learning how to do this too! Next time I make up a glaze with dark wax I’ll do one for that.
  • And do small sections. Don’t let the first layer of clear dry! Right after clear, then add black, do it immediately, then add the clear.
  • wanted to add that you can break after a section, just don’t stop in the middle of the section. Hope that makes sense. In other words I did half the chair last night and half today.
  •  if you’re going to do dark/black wax too then do all at once in sections. You can stop and pause between sections but don’t pause within a section. You don’t want the black/clear to dry too much. I do sometimes come back the next day and still wipe it down again with more clear if I find streaks–it’s possible–I just say don’t stop mid-section as a rule.
  • And I do always buff pieces next day regardless if just clear or a mixture. Gets off the residue and makes them shine!
  • the wax will harden and no longer be tacky when it’s sealed. I have pieces I’ve spilled coffee with no damage and my dog threw up on a table 🤢 and it cleaned right up. No signs of any of it.
  •  I’ll do a tutorial for my next dark wax that is more of a glaze technique.

I don’t know about you, but I’m looking forward to Jan’s next tutorial!  Fingers crossed she will let me share it here, too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private Painting Class

May 11, 2017 – What a great night last night with a fun group of women.  I have serious workshop envy with the shop we painted in last night.  Full bar, huge sinks, bathroom, lots of space, tables, you name it, it was there.

The items brought in to paint were unique and it was fun to see the ideas ffor the pieces forming and final projects.  We may be doing a repeat here this summer.

old school desk – remember these? Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Cupboard Green” on the seat blends well with the rusty legs. A “Cupboard Green” wash on the back brings out the carvings. : )

See the ratchet piece under the top. This table adjusts in height. Very clever. Painted with Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Clothesline” and then distressed, it is beautiful!

This was a family heirloom that needed a new look. Painted with Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January” and “Cupboard Green” then distressed, it will look great in a farmhouse styled space.

This unusual piece is an antique plant stand of some kind. Just one coat of Missouri Limestone Paint Company Rural America brought out the wood grain beautifully. A little more distressing and wax – it is now a stunning piece of art.

This table base is painted with Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Grannie’s Lace” and is now waiting for a new table top.

A private painting class and one at Gift Emporium

After some nice weather teasing us with spring, we’ve had interest picking up for painting classes once again in February and March.  Our latest was a private one March 24, 2017 and we traveled all the way to Boss, Missouri.  We had a lot of fun with 8 people (including a 3rd grader who is used to following directions and did great!  What a sweet little girl!  She couldn’t wait to try out the dry brush technique.)  It was held in a gym at a church so we had plenty of room to spread out.

Scroll past the March class photos to see all the projects from the February 25, 2017 class.  It is always fun to see all the old come to life new again.  Loved these pieces that were brought in.

Boss, Missouri Private Class:  March 24, 2017

Before photos:

During:

After:  Their projects turned out great!  I missed getting a pic of the finished plant stand, but it turned out having a great rustic look with using “Old Tin Barn”!

Gift Emporium Class on February 25, 2017

Some Before and During:

A few After Photos: