A Faux Galvanized Tin Hanging Pendant Light

I found a great tutorial for creating faux galvanized tin using paint. I repurposed this brass plated hanging pendant light and it looks like the real thing.

The tutorial shows it on a cardboard box. Since I was painting on metal, I used a spray primer first.

https://shellyhickox.blogspot.com/2015/04/decoart-media-faux-galvanized-canisters.html?m=1

This is what I did:

1. Took the light apart and scuffed up the pieces. Cleaned well.

2. Sprayed all pieces with primer.

3. Painted with Metallic Silver waterbased paint. I put a small amount in plastic cup and painted out of it. I even painted the cord.

4. Added a little Medium gray color chalk-style paint to the metallic, stirred it in, and using a piece of natural sponge, I dabbed it on each piece. I used our brand we own and produce: Missouri Limestone Paint Company.

5. Then I added a little white and dabbed again all over.

6. Then I added some black and dabbed again.

7. Finished by dabbing a little silver metallic with a brush, making sure there wasn’t much paint on the brush.

8. Sealed with Wise Owl Salve.

Creating a Faux Concrete Pot

An experiment to reimagine a small terra cotta pot into a faux concrete one.

Not bad for a first attempt. May use sea salt next time and see what that does.

  1. Mixed calcium carbonate with Missouri Limestone Paint Compamy chalk-style paint with “Coal Shovel” and painted on the pot with a foam dauber to get as much texture as possible.
  2. Painted a light coat of “Cupboard Green over that. Made sure I painted the inside, too.

I didn’t do a light sanding after adding the green. In hindsight, I wish I would have done that to bring out a little of the black.

  1. Painted a light coat of “Sunday Silver” over the green.
  2. Painted a light dry brush of “Winter Gloves” over the “Sunday Silver.
  3. Sanded a little by hand with 220. No sealer necessary.

I added couple of faux cactus from Dollar Tree for a new look.

Saving an Awesome Coffee Table from the Dead

What a makeover! This awesome slate topped huge coffee table was a custom job. We brought it back from the dead as it was in pretty rough shape with a finish that was the old thick rough and nasty varnish. Prepping is definitely the key! Quite the project, right? But once we finish, it will be perfect in the young person’s apartment (once moving day occurs). For now, it will go in mom and dad’s basement family room and still be used by young people. 🙂

The first thing you need to do is spend some time contemplating how to remove the top. Oh, and to find a place to store the slate top until needed again. No problem, it resided under our living room couch until needed. 🙂

It looks like there are screws. I think we will remove the top to make it easier to paint and to see if any repairs are needed. After many minutes of contemplating, the screws were removed. The only repair needed actually was one section on the bottom needed some glue.

The top sanded easily to get it smooth enough to paint. A good cleaning and two coats of our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint “Coal Shovel” and two coats of Varathane Crystal clear water based polyurethane in satin finish later, it was ready for curing.

The top is looking great!

Sanding the bottom piece wasn’t working at all. Danny got a good amount off with stripper, then I did another round of stripping with mineral spirits mixed in. That helped a lot. Then another round of mineral spirits. Cleaned well them sanded again. Used a tack cloth to get rid of any sanding dust. Then cleaned really well again. That finally got it smooth enough for painting.

Whoever says you don’t need to prep if you use chalk-style paint doesn’t know what they are talking about. It was definitely a process on this bottom piece!

Painted with two coats of Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint “Coal Shovel” (https://sharsumpaint.com/missouri-limestone-paint-company-colors/) and sealed with two coats of Varathane water based polyurethane in satin finish. This table is now ready to be put back together!

What an amazing difference!

Now came the task of lining the top and bottom holes for screwing it back together.

Bamboo skewers to the rescue! All holes are now lined up perfectly!

The beautiful slate top was rescued from under the couch and got a good drink of Wise Owl Lemon Verbena Salve. What a difference that made! It smells good now, too!

So happy how it turned out. This table is eventually going in a young person’s apartment. I can just see a group of young people gathered around it. Sitting on colorful pillows that could easily be stored underneath.

There will be a lot of fun times gathered around this coffee table! This is one sturdy, beautiful table now!
Love the black rippled slate top!

A One of a Kind Floral Cow Skull Tray/Wall Hanging Decor

I’ve been on a kick creating stencils lately of farm animals on my Silhouette machine. My latest project has become my favorite! 🙂 I also tried a new staining technique on this one. I will definitely be using this technique again.

I started with a plain new pine board. Danny, my husband and partner in our world of painting and creating, had previously cut a long pine board into 9 x 11 1/2” boards, sanding and rounding the edges. Some we will make into cutting boards, but this one I wanted to make a tray that could also hang up and be used as a wall decoration.

My idea was to give the board a natural, white washed look. I created a coffee stain with used coffee grounds, vinegar, and a steel wool pad. Here’s the tutorial I used: https://www.familyhandyman.com/woodworking/staining-wood/how-to-stain-unfinished-wood-with-used-coffee-grounds/?_cmp=stf

This worked well to darken the wood and bring out the grain. I would have liked for the wood to have been a little darker. When this dried, and after 3 coats, I still thought it would be a little darker but it was fine. I let the solution sit for 24 hours after I mixed it. The next time, I think I would let it sit several days.

After drying, the board was ready for the white wash, I mixed our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company (MLPC) “January” with a little water, painted it on, then used a damp rag to rub it in and wipe it off. I let that dry well and it was ready to stencil.

I really liked the look of the end result – I will be using this technique on a small table top next.

It was now time to stencil. I found an SVG image I loved on Etsy from HeyLena Arts and purchased it. https://www.etsy.com/listing/744390593/cow-skull-svg-floral-wreath-svg-boho-svg?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=floral+cow+skull+svg&ref=sr_gallery-1-3&organic_search_click=1&pro=1

I uploaded the SVG file to my Silhouette machine, traced it and cut it out, using Contact paper. I find this is a cheap and easy way to cut stencils. The Contact paper adheres nicely and is easy to remove. I also use clear Contact paper to transfer the stencil to my project. Press n Seal will also work as a transfer.

Then I did all the “weeding” (picking out the areas of vinyl) for the dark area of the skull. I stenciled those areas with MLPC “French Roast”, a dark brown.

For the flower area, I decided the best way to finish that would be to hand paint it, so that’s what I did. I am no artist, but I did learn to pretty much stay in the lines when coloring in elementary school. ☺️

The MLPC colors used: Crepe Myrtle, Farmhouse Green, Cornflower, Radio Flyer, Sour Green Apples, English Bluebells, and MO Buttercup.

Once all the flower area was dry I sealed front, back, and sides with Varathane water-based Crystal Clear Polyurethane in Satin Finish. I used 5 thin coats for durability. This piece may be used as a tray so I wanted it to stand up to hard use. (It was so pretty out I did the sealing on my deck. I had my book and coffee handy and read while my sealer dries. It only took about 10 minutes for each on this day.)

Now it was time for the handles. I remembered seeing a DIY on Pinterest for creating handles out of strips of leather. I happened to have the perfect belt made of genuine cowhide that I thought would be perfect! I had purchased it at Goodwill some time ago to create handles for a suitcase dresser, so used it for this project instead. I cut two strip of 8” each and we attached them to the edges of the top and bottom of the board using vintage wood screws.

This beautiful, floral cow skull tray/ wall hanging decoration is now complete! I absolutely love how it turned out!

Here are the other projects I have recently completed.

This is a charcuterie/cheese board
Wall decoration

A Faux Succulent on a Can of Vegetables Decoupaged With a Napkin

How pretty, right? You would never know that’s a can of garbanzo beans under there. 😁

I woke up this morning thinking I wanted to napkin decoupage a tin can and add a succulent to it. I had all the supplies except for the tin can. I did have a can of garbanzo beans, though. I didn’t want to waste food, so I decided to just decoupage the full can. I could always just open up the can later. I did realize, too late, that I shouldn’t paint the lid in case I do want to eat the beans. So I would not paint the lid the next time.

I gathered my supplies and got started.

I didn’t use the refried beans. That is there just to show you what a can of vegetables looks like with its clothes on compared to when it is naked. ☺️

Step 1:

I then painted the can, but next time I won’t, just in case I want to open the can later. I used two light coats of “Grannie’s Lace” from our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company. It really doesn’t matter what paint you use. The can also doesn’t need full coverage. The napkin details will show better just by it being white.

Step 2:

The expiration date was already on the bottom of this can. I just added the name in case I forgot what was in there.

Step 3:

I trimmed the napkin to fit the can, leaving a little overlap on the top and sides. Also with napkins you need to pull apart and remove extra layers as you can see in the above photo.

Step 4:

I was now ready to decoupage. I spread a thick layer of Mod Podge onto the can. I cut down a small baggie and tape it small enough to slip my fingers into it like a mitten. I use the plastic to press the napkin into the Mod Podge. This keeps the napkin from tearing as it will stick to your fingers otherwise. Any little bit of plastic will work. You still must press carefully.

Step 5:

After decoupage dried, I sanded the rim of the top. The part sticking up will sand right off, leaving a clean edge. I then added another coat of Mod Podge all over to seal it.

Step 6: Final Step. I just added a little Spanish Moss and a Faux Succulent to the top. You could use a spot of hot glue to hold it in place, but I didn’t. After all, I may just want to open up that can of garbanzo beans. The moss and succulent will be easy to remove. ☺️

Gray Weathered Wood Nesting Tables

https://sharsumpaint.com/2019/06/30/gray-weathered-wood-nesting-tables/

I have been searching for a good way to create a gray weathered wood look for a table top ever since I saw my cousin’s new dining room table. I was sure I could paint something similar.

These nesting tables had been waiting patiently for me to work the gray weathered wood magic on them. The time was now.

I came across a tutorial from Angela Marie Made which showed the look I was going for so I pinned it and waited for the right time to try it. Thank you so much for sharing this technique!

First up, the legs – the tables are well made – solid wood with metal inserts for the legs to screw into. I’m sure there is a furniture term for that but I do not know what that is. Just know the legs easily screw on and off with no worries. We cleaned, hand sanded, then cleaned again and they were ready for paint.

My original idea was to paint the legs a light gray, but once I painted one with a new custom color “MO Graystone” we created in our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint line, I knew it would be too light. So I started dry brushing “Sunday Silver” over the lighter gray, lightly in the detail areas and heavier on the rest! I used just a small amount of paint, dabbing most paint on the brush on paper towel first. This is a great way to distress without sanding and it was fun to watch it happen.

Two down, 10 to go!

Love this distressing technique

Table tops: My husband cleaned, sanded, and cleaned again (top and bottom) and I used Varathane Premium Fast dry stain in Kona. I stained the bottoms for a finished look but did not do the weathered wood finish on them. I thought that Kona would darken them a lot, but actually didn’t. The wood is a very hard wood so I probably could have given them another couple of coats, but I lack patience in waiting for oil stain to dry so I chose to do just one coat.

I watered down the “January” color 50/50 and painted it on, then wiped off excess and rubbed in what was left. I could tell it was going to be lighter so I also used a little “Sunday Silver” here and there and rubbed it in. Yes, it turned out lighter than my inspiration, but I love how it turned out.

Love when the furniture decides how a technique is going to look.

I put five coats of Varathane water based Crystal Clear polyurethane Satin on each table, sanding lightly between coats. I love the satin finish!

Now that I’ve experienced how nice this technique is, my plans are to use this finish on this farm table set I have to paint and sell. But that’s a project for another day.

Bringing a Garden Bench Back to Life!

This garden bench had good bones. It just needed some paint and the boards refreshed and I knew just the way to do it.

First of all – the paint. Our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint is perfect for the cast iron metal on this bench. It actually only took one coat of our gorgeous dark green color called “Evening Shade”. It also needed no sealer. Our chalk-style paint, when used on metals like this, cure naturally with the heat and the sun baking it in.

Yes, we ship!!! You can purchase all of our 45 colors in 16 oz. jars through our online distributor, Connie Mathews of Winston Home Designs.

The whole project took less than two hours, even when you have a cute little helper. 🙂

Next – the wood. The wood was in really good shape, just bleached out and dry. Wise Owl Salve in White Tea scent to the rescue! We don’t sell this product ourselves, but I love it and have used it to rehydrate wood and as a sealer on several projects. It comes in several wonderful scents! I purchase mine through a fellow painter in Massachusetts. I was fortunate to meet Sarah, of the Princess and the Peacock, while on a trip to visit my cousin, who lives about 30 minutes from her shop! I’ve linked her name to the Wise Owl Salve section of her online shop.

I tried to show in the photo below the difference the Salve makes in bringing the wood back to life!

The Salve is so easy to apply, then let it soak it, and buff. And Yes, you can use it on furniture left out in the weather, and we do have some weather here in Missouri. The bench may need a reapplication of wax down the road, but it only takes a few minutes so that isn’t a problem.

And that is all there was to it. This bench now looks almost brand new and holds a prominent spot in my front yard under the trees.

Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.

A Wax Resist Tutorial – Using Chalk-Based Paint and Furniture Wax

I have probably said it before, but I’m saying it again.  I LOVE playing with techniques and color on the 1970’s style plastic furniture.  I have been buying up wall vase sconces and wall candle holder sconces and trying out different techniques.  This is going to help me decide how to paint some solid wood furniture I have with the plastic fronts. These pieces are gorgeous when painted.

The technique I used on this set of wall sconces is a wax resist using the paint we sell, Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint.  Any chalk-based paint should work just as well.  Any furniture wax should work fine also. I used Annie Sloan clear wax mixed with gray paint just because I had it on hand.  Otherwise, I would have used just clear.  You can wait until it is fully dry (about 24 hours) and give it a light coat of wax and polish.  Just don’t rub too hard.

The wax resist, on these sconces, produces an old world layered effect that is just beautiful.  I used 4 colors. over the original gold of the plastic piece, “January” (a pure white), “Sunday Silver” (a medium gray), “Arlington Blue” (a medium blue), and “English Bluebells” (a light blue).

View the Tutorial Here:  https://youtu.be/pcmhZ5Ydb64 

Photos from the tutorial: 

 

 

The Best Black/Dark Wax over Chalk Paint Tutorial Ever! by Jan Brown Kissick

janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep7janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep27I love finding great tutorials to help me with techniques I want to learn while painting with chalk-based paints.  Sometimes you find that perfect one and think…..where was that tutorial when I needed it?? Like that time when I didn’t know what I was doing applying dark wax to a green cabinet and it turned out looking like camouflage. Raise your hand if you know what I mean.

Well, wonder no more on how to apply dark wax.  This tutorial by Jan will provide you with clear step-by-step instructions that you will want to save. Trust me…..it is good!

First of all I want to make it very clear this was not written by me.  I make camouflage pieces, remember?  This excellent tutorial was written by Jan Brown Kissick who has kindly given me permission to use her photos and her words to share this with all of you.

Jan wrote this tutorial in a post for a chalk painting Facebook group I belong to called Chalk Paint, Distress and Decoupage.  Good info here.  If you’d like to join, here’s the link:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/Chalkpaint101/

I will stop rambling now and share Jan’s tutorial in her own words.

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Steps I Do for a Black/Dark Wax Tutorial by Jan Brown Kissick

Ok someone has asked me to show the steps I do for black/dark wax. {EDITED: following Steps are for when using a darker color of paint and only based off of my experience with Annie Sloan products! Use clear wax first on lighter paint colors–immediately–do not let sit before starting your dark/black wax!} I’ll state that I’m definitely not a pro but I’m not brand new either. I’ve learned a lot of lessons the hard way and I’m sure there’s still more to learn! Hope this helps you all! There are captions with each picture.

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1. Set up old movie on your tablet for entertainment I get tired of music so like listening to (love Audrey H!) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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2. 1 paper plate for clear wax, 1 for black/dark Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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3. spoonful of clear wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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4. Spoonful of black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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5. Cut down cheap chip brush –load with black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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6. Scott shop towels Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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7. 2 coats of paint fully dried AS Emperors Silk. Anyone else hearing clown 🤡 music? I don’t like this red without black wax. If you do great! It’s just not me. So let’s add black wax. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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8. Brushing on black wax in small sections-(only doing black first bc it’s a darker pigment paint color. If yours is light, then start with clear. Recommend trying small spot to see how black wax first works for you and follow remaining steps) Photos by Jan Brown Kissick

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9. Looks like crap right? 💩🤣 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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10. Tear off towel and fold into fourths ( or whatever’s comfortable for you) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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11. Wipe off wax as much as possible turn over cloth often,otherwise you will just put wax back on. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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12. Now get clear wax on new section of towel or get new towel. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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13. Not a whole lot but make sure you get some! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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14.  I “dab” the clear wax on  Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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15. Then wipe it off. Remember to turn cloth over often!! Or will create “bare spots” Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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16. Keep wiping, adding more clear wax until blended well. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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17. Blended! (Top of arm) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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18. Applied the black wax… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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19. Blended! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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20. 😳😳are you scared??? This is when you panic right???😳😳😳 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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21. It will be okay! Keep adding clear, keep blending, remember to turn that cloth over and get new cloth! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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22. Blending… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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23. Okay…maybe there’s hope… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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24. Not worrying about that bottom too much. Will have a cushion over it. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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25. Look at that leg! 😎😎 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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26. Ta-da!!! Done!!!! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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27. Happy!! 😍😍😍 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

Some addtional comments from Jan after questions on group post:

  •  If using a light color do clear wax first. If using a large surface like a table, buffet, dresser I use a wax brush for the clear to apply but always blend with cloth. Don’t want to get dark wax on your clear wax brush.
  • clear wax–if only using clear–the technique is different. Just making sure I clarify that.
  • On lighter colors…yes do clear first. Colors with more pigment should be fine with black first. Try it first as I suppose it will depend on your piece. Hope it works for you as It will save you wax!
  • want to make sure not misleading people into thinking you don’t need to do clear wax first–you will on lighter colors! Also this is only for Annie Sloan’s products. I’ve used other products in the past and I never had much luck with them. Not sure they will work the same. Thanks everyone for the great feedback. My first tutorial so I’m learning how to do this too! Next time I make up a glaze with dark wax I’ll do one for that.
  • And do small sections. Don’t let the first layer of clear dry! Right after clear, then add black, do it immediately, then add the clear.
  • wanted to add that you can break after a section, just don’t stop in the middle of the section. Hope that makes sense. In other words I did half the chair last night and half today.
  •  if you’re going to do dark/black wax too then do all at once in sections. You can stop and pause between sections but don’t pause within a section. You don’t want the black/clear to dry too much. I do sometimes come back the next day and still wipe it down again with more clear if I find streaks–it’s possible–I just say don’t stop mid-section as a rule.
  • And I do always buff pieces next day regardless if just clear or a mixture. Gets off the residue and makes them shine!
  • the wax will harden and no longer be tacky when it’s sealed. I have pieces I’ve spilled coffee with no damage and my dog threw up on a table 🤢 and it cleaned right up. No signs of any of it.
  •  I’ll do a tutorial for my next dark wax that is more of a glaze technique.

I don’t know about you, but I’m looking forward to Jan’s next tutorial!  Fingers crossed she will let me share it here, too!