Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.

A Wax Resist Tutorial – Using Chalk-Based Paint and Furniture Wax

I have probably said it before, but I’m saying it again.  I LOVE playing with techniques and color on the 1970’s style plastic furniture.  I have been buying up wall vase sconces and wall candle holder sconces and trying out different techniques.  This is going to help me decide how to paint some solid wood furniture I have with the plastic fronts. These pieces are gorgeous when painted.

The technique I used on this set of wall sconces is a wax resist using the paint we sell, Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint.  Any chalk-based paint should work just as well.  Any furniture wax should work fine also. I used Annie Sloan clear wax mixed with gray paint just because I had it on hand.  Otherwise, I would have used just clear.  You can wait until it is fully dry (about 24 hours) and give it a light coat of wax and polish.  Just don’t rub too hard.

The wax resist, on these sconces, produces an old world layered effect that is just beautiful.  I used 4 colors. over the original gold of the plastic piece, “January” (a pure white), “Sunday Silver” (a medium gray), “Arlington Blue” (a medium blue), and “English Bluebells” (a light blue).

View the Tutorial Here:  https://youtu.be/pcmhZ5Ydb64 

Photos from the tutorial: 

 

 

The Best Black/Dark Wax over Chalk Paint Tutorial Ever! by Jan Brown Kissick

janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep7janbrownkissick_darkwaxtutorialstep27I love finding great tutorials to help me with techniques I want to learn while painting with chalk-based paints.  Sometimes you find that perfect one and think…..where was that tutorial when I needed it?? Like that time when I didn’t know what I was doing applying dark wax to a green cabinet and it turned out looking like camouflage. Raise your hand if you know what I mean.

Well, wonder no more on how to apply dark wax.  This tutorial by Jan will provide you with clear step-by-step instructions that you will want to save. Trust me…..it is good!

First of all I want to make it very clear this was not written by me.  I make camouflage pieces, remember?  This excellent tutorial was written by Jan Brown Kissick who has kindly given me permission to use her photos and her words to share this with all of you.

Jan wrote this tutorial in a post for a chalk painting Facebook group I belong to called Chalk Paint, Distress and Decoupage.  Good info here.  If you’d like to join, here’s the link:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/Chalkpaint101/

I will stop rambling now and share Jan’s tutorial in her own words.

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Steps I Do for a Black/Dark Wax Tutorial by Jan Brown Kissick

Ok someone has asked me to show the steps I do for black/dark wax. {EDITED: following Steps are for when using a darker color of paint and only based off of my experience with Annie Sloan products! Use clear wax first on lighter paint colors–immediately–do not let sit before starting your dark/black wax!} I’ll state that I’m definitely not a pro but I’m not brand new either. I’ve learned a lot of lessons the hard way and I’m sure there’s still more to learn! Hope this helps you all! There are captions with each picture.

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1. Set up old movie on your tablet for entertainment I get tired of music so like listening to (love Audrey H!) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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2. 1 paper plate for clear wax, 1 for black/dark Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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3. spoonful of clear wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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4. Spoonful of black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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5. Cut down cheap chip brush –load with black wax Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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6. Scott shop towels Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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7. 2 coats of paint fully dried AS Emperors Silk. Anyone else hearing clown 🤡 music? I don’t like this red without black wax. If you do great! It’s just not me. So let’s add black wax. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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8. Brushing on black wax in small sections-(only doing black first bc it’s a darker pigment paint color. If yours is light, then start with clear. Recommend trying small spot to see how black wax first works for you and follow remaining steps) Photos by Jan Brown Kissick

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9. Looks like crap right? 💩🤣 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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10. Tear off towel and fold into fourths ( or whatever’s comfortable for you) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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11. Wipe off wax as much as possible turn over cloth often,otherwise you will just put wax back on. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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12. Now get clear wax on new section of towel or get new towel. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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13. Not a whole lot but make sure you get some! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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14.  I “dab” the clear wax on  Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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15. Then wipe it off. Remember to turn cloth over often!! Or will create “bare spots” Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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16. Keep wiping, adding more clear wax until blended well. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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17. Blended! (Top of arm) Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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18. Applied the black wax… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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19. Blended! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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20. 😳😳are you scared??? This is when you panic right???😳😳😳 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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21. It will be okay! Keep adding clear, keep blending, remember to turn that cloth over and get new cloth! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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22. Blending… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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23. Okay…maybe there’s hope… Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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24. Not worrying about that bottom too much. Will have a cushion over it. Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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25. Look at that leg! 😎😎 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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26. Ta-da!!! Done!!!! Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

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27. Happy!! 😍😍😍 Photo by Jan Brown Kissick

Some addtional comments from Jan after questions on group post:

  •  If using a light color do clear wax first. If using a large surface like a table, buffet, dresser I use a wax brush for the clear to apply but always blend with cloth. Don’t want to get dark wax on your clear wax brush.
  • clear wax–if only using clear–the technique is different. Just making sure I clarify that.
  • On lighter colors…yes do clear first. Colors with more pigment should be fine with black first. Try it first as I suppose it will depend on your piece. Hope it works for you as It will save you wax!
  • want to make sure not misleading people into thinking you don’t need to do clear wax first–you will on lighter colors! Also this is only for Annie Sloan’s products. I’ve used other products in the past and I never had much luck with them. Not sure they will work the same. Thanks everyone for the great feedback. My first tutorial so I’m learning how to do this too! Next time I make up a glaze with dark wax I’ll do one for that.
  • And do small sections. Don’t let the first layer of clear dry! Right after clear, then add black, do it immediately, then add the clear.
  • wanted to add that you can break after a section, just don’t stop in the middle of the section. Hope that makes sense. In other words I did half the chair last night and half today.
  •  if you’re going to do dark/black wax too then do all at once in sections. You can stop and pause between sections but don’t pause within a section. You don’t want the black/clear to dry too much. I do sometimes come back the next day and still wipe it down again with more clear if I find streaks–it’s possible–I just say don’t stop mid-section as a rule.
  • And I do always buff pieces next day regardless if just clear or a mixture. Gets off the residue and makes them shine!
  • the wax will harden and no longer be tacky when it’s sealed. I have pieces I’ve spilled coffee with no damage and my dog threw up on a table 🤢 and it cleaned right up. No signs of any of it.
  •  I’ll do a tutorial for my next dark wax that is more of a glaze technique.

I don’t know about you, but I’m looking forward to Jan’s next tutorial!  Fingers crossed she will let me share it here, too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private Painting Class

May 11, 2017 – What a great night last night with a fun group of women.  I have serious workshop envy with the shop we painted in last night.  Full bar, huge sinks, bathroom, lots of space, tables, you name it, it was there.

The items brought in to paint were unique and it was fun to see the ideas ffor the pieces forming and final projects.  We may be doing a repeat here this summer.

old school desk – remember these? Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Cupboard Green” on the seat blends well with the rusty legs. A “Cupboard Green” wash on the back brings out the carvings. : )

See the ratchet piece under the top. This table adjusts in height. Very clever. Painted with Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Clothesline” and then distressed, it is beautiful!

This was a family heirloom that needed a new look. Painted with Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January” and “Cupboard Green” then distressed, it will look great in a farmhouse styled space.

This unusual piece is an antique plant stand of some kind. Just one coat of Missouri Limestone Paint Company Rural America brought out the wood grain beautifully. A little more distressing and wax – it is now a stunning piece of art.

This table base is painted with Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Grannie’s Lace” and is now waiting for a new table top.

A private painting class and one at Gift Emporium

After some nice weather teasing us with spring, we’ve had interest picking up for painting classes once again in February and March.  Our latest was a private one March 24, 2017 and we traveled all the way to Boss, Missouri.  We had a lot of fun with 8 people (including a 3rd grader who is used to following directions and did great!  What a sweet little girl!  She couldn’t wait to try out the dry brush technique.)  It was held in a gym at a church so we had plenty of room to spread out.

Scroll past the March class photos to see all the projects from the February 25, 2017 class.  It is always fun to see all the old come to life new again.  Loved these pieces that were brought in.

Boss, Missouri Private Class:  March 24, 2017

Before photos:

During:

After:  Their projects turned out great!  I missed getting a pic of the finished plant stand, but it turned out having a great rustic look with using “Old Tin Barn”!

Gift Emporium Class on February 25, 2017

Some Before and During:

A few After Photos:

 

A Coffee Bar from a Dresser

Yes, please.  I wasn’t going to pick up my paint brush until after Christmas but….I just had to.  I felt the need to de-clutter after Thanksgiving and it came to me that I should make myself a coffee bar.  The piece could be used to store coffee cups, coffee, coffee pot, crock pot, toaster, and whatever else would fit and clear up some space in my small kitchen.

I just happened to have a long, narrow dresser that I hadn’t been able to decide how to finish.  I knew I wanted to paint the drawers different colors due to the way the top drawer was made.  So, Danny dug it out of our shed and we went to work.  He cleaned it up and I started painting.

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The piece (I call it a dresser, but not sure what it actually was) is made of pine.  The top was in pretty good shape except for a couple of gouges and scratches.  Danny sanded the top a little and smoothed it out and then I used my secret weapon:  Varathane Water-based stain and sealer in Dark Walnut.  I love this stuff.  It goes on so smooth, really brings out the wood grain, and dries quickly.  I used 3 coats, sanding lightly in between.  It dries pretty shiny, though, and I wanted to use the semi-gloss water-based poly on the rest of the cabinet so I put two coats of it on after.  The top is so smooth, with just a little sheen.  I love the distressed look of the scratches and gouges.

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After 3 coats of stain/sealer – pretty shiny

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After 2 coats of poly – really toned it down. Now has a nice soft, sheen.

Then, I wanted to paint the base gray to match my kitchen cabinets, which were Annie Sloan Paris Gray.  So, I took some Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Winter Gloves” and mixed in a little dark “Gray Goose” and it came out pretty darn close.  You’d never know they weren’t exactly the same.  I painted the drawers the same colors I painted my chairs in the dining room. (“Sour Green Apple”, “Old Tin Barn”, “Trading Post”, and “African Violet”) I also bought some gray printed burlap at Jo-Ann’s for the doors and my daughter-in-law, Daphney, suggested adding chicken wire.  I found that at Hobby Lobby.  The chicken wire was the perfect final touch!

I’m very happy with the results.  It’s probably one of my favorite things I’ve done….possibly because I get to keep it.  That didn’t stop me from thinking, “Hmmm…I wonder if people would be interested in buying this coffee bar?”  After all, I have a dining room set to match and I can always paint another table and chairs.  : )  Nah…..I’m keeping this.  For awhile, anyway.  However, you never know that else will come up that I may want to paint just for me. But best of all, it has given me some counter top and  cabinet space in the kitchen.  Yay.

Meet my new coffee bar:

 

 

 

TIP OF THE WEEK: November 3, 2016 – Steampunk Decor – Who Knew?

For previous TIP OF THE WEEK click here.

I have to admit, before I started painting furniture I had never heard of Steampunk or Steampunk Decor.

steam·punk
ˈstēmˌpəNGk/
noun
a genre of science fiction that typically features steam-powered machinery rather than advanced technology.

Steampunk incorporates technology and aesthetic designs inspired by 19th-century industrial steam-powered machinery. Steampunk decor will then have elements of machinery and the elegance of 19th century design.

I found this article does a great job of explaining Steampunk and Steampunk Decor.

http://www.impressiveinteriordesign.com/steampunk-interior-design-style-decorating-ideas/

Here’s what came up with a Google Search on Steampunk Decor.  Browse through some of these links to get an idea of the look.

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=steampunk%20decor 

For previous TIP OF THE WEEK, click here.

Why am I so interested in learning more about this unusual interior design? I have a customer who really likes this and looks for pieces that will fit. So, I made it my business to find out…and you know what? It’s pretty fascinating stuff.

I’ve done a couple of pieces now for him. I call it a Steampunk type look. Not exactly the real deal, but reminiscent of true Steampunk.

The first piece was a marble top coffee table. The middle piece of marble was missing and had been replaced with glass. I painted the table black and bought a piece of fabric from Jo-Ann’s which featured some of the colors of Steampunk and included images of a map, post office stamps, etc. I covered a thin board and stapled it on the back. I put it under the glass (it fit fine as with the board and the glass, the width was just about the same as the original marble and ended up with a cool, Steampunk look coffee table.

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Then, this cool clock came to me through a friend and I thought it would really be a statement piece. I painted it black and an out of date nautical clock has now been elevated to a Steampunk look. My customer loved it and purchased it on the spot.
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I’m kind of liking this Steampunk Decor.