A Faux Galvanized Tin Hanging Pendant Light

I found a great tutorial for creating faux galvanized tin using paint. I repurposed this brass plated hanging pendant light and it looks like the real thing.

The tutorial shows it on a cardboard box. Since I was painting on metal, I used a spray primer first.

https://shellyhickox.blogspot.com/2015/04/decoart-media-faux-galvanized-canisters.html?m=1

This is what I did:

1. Took the light apart and scuffed up the pieces. Cleaned well.

2. Sprayed all pieces with primer.

3. Painted with Metallic Silver waterbased paint. I put a small amount in plastic cup and painted out of it. I even painted the cord.

4. Added a little Medium gray color chalk-style paint to the metallic, stirred it in, and using a piece of natural sponge, I dabbed it on each piece. I used our brand we own and produce: Missouri Limestone Paint Company.

5. Then I added a little white and dabbed again all over.

6. Then I added some black and dabbed again.

7. Finished by dabbing a little silver metallic with a brush, making sure there wasn’t much paint on the brush.

8. Sealed with Wise Owl Salve.

A Black and White Coffee Bar Sign

I created this fun coffee bar sign. It was easy and turned out great!

I started with an 11×14” thin canvas board from Dollar Tree and a package of Priss wall stickers from Dollar General. I used Mod Podge to glue them down and Varathane water-based polyurethane satin finish to seal them.

I laid out the words in a design I liked and then took the backing off the first one to apply. I saw right away the adhesive wasn’t sticking well to the canvas board so I made the decision to use Mod Podge to glue each one down.

Once they were all down and sealed well l gave them another coat of Mod a Podge.

I will usually use a hair dryer to help the dry time and use my fingers to press down to help alleviate any lifting or bubbles.

I didn’t care for the gloss of the Mod Podge so I used the Varathane satin finish polyurethane to seal and gave it two thin coats. I like to use a damp car sponge to apply polyurethane. It now had a nice matte finish.

I thought a black frame would set it off. I didn’t want to go to Dollar Tree so I started searching for an 11×14” frame I might have. Score! I found a frame and it is vintage! I know it is vintage because it held my husband’s 1971 college diploma. Lol! Not anymore!

I kept the glass in as it will help with durability.

And there you have it! An adorable black and white 11×14” coffee bar sign. Wouldn’t it look great paired with a set of Rae Dunn coffee mugs?

A Round Pedestal Table Gets an Amazing Makeover

I found this small (20.75” tall and 24” wide) solid wood table at a flea market about a year ago.

https://sharsumpaint.com/2020/07/16/a-round-pedestal-table-gets-an-amazing-makeover/

It was in good shape, but dated. It needed a makeover. We had sanded the top almost all the way, but it still needed a bit more to get it down to bare wood.

However, life got in the way and so it sat in our basement waiting patiently for its makeover.

A few days ago, it happened. I took the heat gun and stripped away the rest of the residue on the top, then sanded it smooth and hand scuffed the base. I cleaned it well.

I couldn’t wait to try out the DIY wood aging stain recipe I found and mixed up. It had been sitting waiting to be used for several weeks. I had tried it right after I mixed it up on a board. I think it reacts differently on different types of wood and it really hadn’t had a chance to darken the wood much. But, it turned out with a beautiful, natural wood look that I loved.

The stain is a mix of used coffee grounds, vinegar and steel wool. It doesn’t look very pretty in the jar, but wait until you see it on this oak table top!

Here’s the link to the DIY tutorial I found and used: https://www.familyhandyman.com/article/how-to-stain-unfinished-wood-with-used-coffee-grounds/?_cmp=stf

The interesting thing is you don’t see how it is working until it dries. At first it looks like it is just darkening the wood (and it darkens more as it dries) but when it dries, ahhhh….there is that beautiful grayish cast….just like old barn wood that has been left out in the weather for years. And this photo doesn’t even do it justice.

Hmmm…..At this point I happened to notice a strange formation in the grain going across the top. In my eye, I saw a llama head and neck. There are actually 4 of them, seeming to march in a line across the table, but this one stands out more than others. Still not seeing it? Let me help you. Lol

So now I had the stain on, but I wanted to really enhance the old wood look so I sealed it with a mix of liming wax and clear wax.

I wanted to open up the grain for the liming wax to get into it and stay so I used a wire brush and carefully ran it across the table top, going with the grain.

The liming wax I used is by Briwax. I mixed some of it with Howard’s Chalk-tique light wax. You can use any brand of clear wax, though. Mixing them together gives you a little more control over the liming wax and provides a nice finish. I think you can purchase both of these products from several places like Amazon online.

The next photo shows half the table top with the liming wax combo and half without. What a difference the liming wax makes!!

Can you see my 4 marching llamas? I know…. they are hard to see. Lol

Let me help. 🙂

Here is the top all waxed and buffed. Again, pics don’t really show just how beautiful this table top is. The sheen of the wax is gorgeous!

By the way, did you know wax helps repel dust? So using wax on furniture that isn’t going to get a lot of heavy use will save you dusting time, too!

The little metal feet needed a makeover, too, so I took them off and spray painted them a metallic gold. So pretty now!

Now it was time to paint the base. Sometimes I use primer, sometimes I don’t. I didn’t on this one. I had just cleaned and scuffed it up really well. In retrospect, I wish I had primed this and I wouldn’t have had to use as many coats of chalk-style paint, especially since I wasn’t going to distress this piece. I used 4 coats of Missouri Limestone Paint Company “January”, a pure white. You tend to need more coats when using white or very light colors.

But all is well as chalk-style paint dries so quickly. Once the paint coats had all dried well I sealed the base with several thin coats of Varathane Crystal Clear water based polyurethane. I never have had a problem with yellowing in the 6 years I’ve been using it.

The secret is thin coats and no drips or pooling. I use a round damp car wax sponge to put on a thin coat and follow it with a sponge brush if needed to clear up any drips or pooling. For long areas I go in one direction only and work quickly. You can’t go back and forth or overwork the sealer or you will have a mess as it dries so quickly.

And now…. drum roll ….. My finished “llama table!” 😉 What a difference, right?

A Faux Succulent on a Can of Vegetables Decoupaged With a Napkin

How pretty, right? You would never know that’s a can of garbanzo beans under there. 😁

I woke up this morning thinking I wanted to napkin decoupage a tin can and add a succulent to it. I had all the supplies except for the tin can. I did have a can of garbanzo beans, though. I didn’t want to waste food, so I decided to just decoupage the full can. I could always just open up the can later. I did realize, too late, that I shouldn’t paint the lid in case I do want to eat the beans. So I would not paint the lid the next time.

I gathered my supplies and got started.

I didn’t use the refried beans. That is there just to show you what a can of vegetables looks like with its clothes on compared to when it is naked. ☺️

Step 1:

I then painted the can, but next time I won’t, just in case I want to open the can later. I used two light coats of “Grannie’s Lace” from our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company. It really doesn’t matter what paint you use. The can also doesn’t need full coverage. The napkin details will show better just by it being white.

Step 2:

The expiration date was already on the bottom of this can. I just added the name in case I forgot what was in there.

Step 3:

I trimmed the napkin to fit the can, leaving a little overlap on the top and sides. Also with napkins you need to pull apart and remove extra layers as you can see in the above photo.

Step 4:

I was now ready to decoupage. I spread a thick layer of Mod Podge onto the can. I cut down a small baggie and tape it small enough to slip my fingers into it like a mitten. I use the plastic to press the napkin into the Mod Podge. This keeps the napkin from tearing as it will stick to your fingers otherwise. Any little bit of plastic will work. You still must press carefully.

Step 5:

After decoupage dried, I sanded the rim of the top. The part sticking up will sand right off, leaving a clean edge. I then added another coat of Mod Podge all over to seal it.

Step 6: Final Step. I just added a little Spanish Moss and a Faux Succulent to the top. You could use a spot of hot glue to hold it in place, but I didn’t. After all, I may just want to open up that can of garbanzo beans. The moss and succulent will be easy to remove. ☺️

Turning a Funky Yellow Tray into a Rustic Faux Succulent Garden

I bought this tray about a year ago and never really did anything with it.

It’s not really wood and it was a funky yellow color. But yesterday, I decided. I would create a rustic, driftwood finish on it ….

…. and plant a faux succulent garden. Those seem really popular right now.

I already had the two pinkish succulents and I found a few more at Dollar Tree at some point in time. I removed the clips attached to those and saved the clips. You never know when they could be used. 🙂

Using our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint, I paint washed the tray with “French Roast”, wiping it down before it dried. When dry, I dry brushed with “Sunday Silver”, let that dry, then dry brushed with “Winter Gloves”. When that dried, I sanded the whole thing with 320 sandpaper, applied a wax salve, and buffed it. I love the color now! It now has a rustic, driftwood look.

This morning, I added some mosses from Dollar Tree and now have a beautiful succulent garden. I just need to figure out where I will display it.

Self-Distancing Crafting With SharSum Paint – Day 4

March 20, 2020

/ Day 1 / Day 2 / Day 3 / Day 4 / Day 5 / Day 6 / Day 7 / Day 8 / Day 9 / Day 10 /

Life Hacks

Today isn’t really crafting related (although there is some DIY crafting) but many of these ideas can help make your life easier. More may be added as I find new ideas I like, but these should keep you busy for awhile as you are social distancing. Stay healthy! We will get through this together!

* DIY Coffee Filter Hydrangeas

This one is a craft. I’ve actually made one of these. It was fun to do, and really does look like a hydrangea.

* Fold fitted sheets in a brilliant way

You’ve probably seen this one before and tried it, but didn’t have time to practice with it. Now, you have plenty of time, so try again. 🙂

* Command Cord Bundlers

Power cords hanging around all over your kitchen cabinets? These bundlers will help solve that problem. Can you think of other uses for them?

* Uncommon Ways to use common things

This is a Pinterest link. Ignore they spelled uncommon wrong 😳, and just watch the video. Visiting the site does not show these ideas. You can get a lot of good ideas just from the video. My favorite one is melting a candle over crushed ice. My aunts did a version of this with me when I was growing up. Pretty cool.

* Fold laundry 5x faster

You’ve seen the t-shirt folders in stores and ones you can buy. This is one you make from cardboard and duct tape. Just watch and learn from the video. No need to visit the site. Let me know if this one works. I will tell my laundryman. 🙂 P.S. When the video is over, you can click on the link at the top to see more of her ideas.

Time Saver DIY Hack – a Mani/Pedi While Riding in Car From St. Louis to Chicago

Technically, you could call this a painting project. Painting nails. So I say this counts as an appropriate post for my blog. 😁

And if you’ve ever traveled the roads from Missouri through Illinois to get to the Chicago area, you know you need a distraction. Until you get to the wind turbines. I love seeing the wind turbines. I think they look so peaceful.

I was so busy getting ready to go on a trip after some marathon painting and delivering furniture and grandkids visiting, I didn’t have time to actually fit in a visit to the nail salon. And let’s face it. When you are a painter, salon manicures are pretty much a waste of time anyway.

But, I did think ahead so I brought along some nail supplies, planning on doing it in the car while my husband drove. I pretty much make him drive all the time when we go on trips. I learned early on if he was going to tell me step by step how to drive, then he might as well do it himself. Am I right? So, through the years that has freed me up to enjoy many things along the route… grading papers, reading, sleeping, working on the computer (love my hot spot -except when I forget to turn it off-?uh oh), and now setting up a portable nail salon.

First of all I must thank McDonalds. Without their donations, this would have been just another paint your nails in the car thing which would be no big deal. But McDonalds made this a game changer. 😂

I posted this on my Facebook page, too. I tell you, this is going to go viral! Feel free to like my post, my FB page, and share, share, share. You can say you know me when I become an Internet sensation! https://facebook.com/sharsumpaint

Important supplies:

* Used coffee cup from McDonalds (dry it with a napkin they provide)

* Drink carrier (who knew when we accepted McDonald’s offer of one that it would make the perfect salon tray)

* Handy dandy little knife found in the console. 🤷🏼‍♀️ An amazing assortment of items in there. I could take it on Let’s Make a Deal and come home a winner. Note: Be sure to get a lesson on how to close the knife. 🙄

* Those foam things for your toes because God knows its going to be hard enough as it is contorting your body in the front seat to get to them in the first place. You sure don’t want smudges.

* Car air conditioner turned on full blast

Car air conditioner vent works great for drying!

* And, of course nail polish

* First, cut down the coffee cup with the knife. Be careful because this is a dangerous little thing.

* Finally make a pit stop at a rest area before you begin because you don’t want to be interrupted.

*Arrange your supplies and you are all set!

That’s it! Enjoy this life hack you are sure to try again and again.

Warning: This is it on the pics. The actual contortions getting a salon perfect mani/pedi won’t be pretty. And neither will the finished pedicure. I may share the manicure. We will see.

Update: Ok….you get to see a bit of the mani. The hand may or may not have gotten a little bit of filtering.😉

Update: I know I wasn’t going to share any pedi pics (I truly hate seeing those myself) but this is too funny not to share. Turn the mode of the car air conditioner to the leg area and stick your feet under the dash. Perfect pedi drying!

Update: Last pedi pic, I promise. This is all you get to see…think Wilson on Home Improvement … when you only got to see the top of his face. Trust me, you’ll thank me that you are only seeing the top of my toes. But, those sparkles really finish the pedi off nicely. 🥳

Now, what can I do for 2 more hours traveling from Missouri to Chicago? Not as many cornfields to see due to flooding.

And I still can’t believe the luck of finding this knife tool! I’m sure it has a 1,001 more uses. 😂

Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.

A Coffee Bar from a Dresser

Yes, please.  I wasn’t going to pick up my paint brush until after Christmas but….I just had to.  I felt the need to de-clutter after Thanksgiving and it came to me that I should make myself a coffee bar.  The piece could be used to store coffee cups, coffee, coffee pot, crock pot, toaster, and whatever else would fit and clear up some space in my small kitchen.

I just happened to have a long, narrow dresser that I hadn’t been able to decide how to finish.  I knew I wanted to paint the drawers different colors due to the way the top drawer was made.  So, Danny dug it out of our shed and we went to work.  He cleaned it up and I started painting.

coffeebar-original

The piece (I call it a dresser, but not sure what it actually was) is made of pine.  The top was in pretty good shape except for a couple of gouges and scratches.  Danny sanded the top a little and smoothed it out and then I used my secret weapon:  Varathane Water-based stain and sealer in Dark Walnut.  I love this stuff.  It goes on so smooth, really brings out the wood grain, and dries quickly.  I used 3 coats, sanding lightly in between.  It dries pretty shiny, though, and I wanted to use the semi-gloss water-based poly on the rest of the cabinet so I put two coats of it on after.  The top is so smooth, with just a little sheen.  I love the distressed look of the scratches and gouges.

coffeebartopwithstainsealer

After 3 coats of stain/sealer – pretty shiny

coffeebartopwithpoly

After 2 coats of poly – really toned it down. Now has a nice soft, sheen.

Then, I wanted to paint the base gray to match my kitchen cabinets, which were Annie Sloan Paris Gray.  So, I took some Missouri Limestone Paint Company “Winter Gloves” and mixed in a little dark “Gray Goose” and it came out pretty darn close.  You’d never know they weren’t exactly the same.  I painted the drawers the same colors I painted my chairs in the dining room. (“Sour Green Apple”, “Old Tin Barn”, “Trading Post”, and “African Violet”) I also bought some gray printed burlap at Jo-Ann’s for the doors and my daughter-in-law, Daphney, suggested adding chicken wire.  I found that at Hobby Lobby.  The chicken wire was the perfect final touch!

I’m very happy with the results.  It’s probably one of my favorite things I’ve done….possibly because I get to keep it.  That didn’t stop me from thinking, “Hmmm…I wonder if people would be interested in buying this coffee bar?”  After all, I have a dining room set to match and I can always paint another table and chairs.  : )  Nah…..I’m keeping this.  For awhile, anyway.  However, you never know that else will come up that I may want to paint just for me. But best of all, it has given me some counter top and  cabinet space in the kitchen.  Yay.

Meet my new coffee bar:

 

 

TIP OF THE WEEK: November 12, 2016 – DIY ANTIQUING WAX

For previous TIP OF THE WEEK click here.

Those who know us, know we recommend using toulene-free Briwax with Missouri Limestone Paint Company’s chalk-based paint.  It is so nice and buttery and goes on smoothly.  It rubs in well.  Then, with just a bit of buffing, you get a nice soft sheen.  Briwax does not take a lot of elbow grease and that’s always good.

Briwax does sell dark wax and we can and do get it.  It is great for a uniform color and if you have a very large project or do a lot of distressing with dark wax to get an antique look.  The consistency is a little different than the clear.  It goes into a liquid phase much quicker than the clear.  However, a few minutes in the refrigerator and you are back to a solid again.  This is normal, so don’t worry if your dark wax turns liquid.  Briwax also sells a liming wax.  I talked about liming wax in a previous Tip of the Week, when I did a tutorial on getting the restoration hardware look. Liming wax looks great over colors when you want to get that white washed beachy look.  I would not use it in bathrooms or kitchens, however.  For those areas, I would just thin down some white paint with water and do a wash.  Brush it on and wipe it off, then poly.

A good rule to follow when using any kind of antiquing wax – USE CLEAR WAX FIRST!  The reason is the clear wax base allows you to move the antiquing wax around more to get the look you want.  If you get too much just use a little more clear wax to wipe it off.  Without the clear wax, you won’t be able to work it as much and may not be happy with the final results.

Update:  It is very important to use Clear wax first on light colors.  On dark colors, however, I recently came across a tutorial in which clear wax isn’t applied first but in conjunction with the dark wax.  This produced beautiful results.  Keep in mind, you are still applying the clear wax before the dark wax has a chance to dry. https://sharsumpaint.com/2017/08/13/the-best-blackdark-wax-over-chalk-paint-tutorial-ever-by-jan-brown-kissick/

You also may not want to purchase a large can of dark wax or liming wax for just a small project or if you are experimenting with distressing techniques.  This is where this DIY tip comes in.  You can make your own antiquing wax with clear, toulene-free Briwax and any color of Missouri Limestone Painting Company (MLPC) paint you choose.  For liming wax I use “January” but I’ve made  antiquing wax with “French Roast” and “Grey Goose”, too. Can you use other waxes or paint?  I suppose, but I don’t sell those.  I stick to only what I like and use myself.

There is no scientific mix thing you need to know.  This is pretty simple.  I take about 2 Tablespoons of Briwax and mix in about 1 Tablespoon of MLPC.  Stir it well.  That’s it!  That’s all there is to it.  You can apply with a rag or brush. REMEMBER:  A clear coat of Briwax goes on first.  A tip I learned is to take one of the cheap chip brushes and cut about an inch off it.  You’ll then have a pretty sturdy, stumpy brush.  Applying your wax with this stumpy brush will let you dab it into all the nooks and crannies and move it around really well.  Make sure you don’t use too much and that you rub it in well.  You don’t want to have too much wax.  Let it dry for a bit and then buff.  Then apply your antiquing wax in the same way.  Work it around to get the look you are going for.  Then let it dry and buff.

That’s it!  This DIY tip is a great way for you to practice.  Go on….try it. It’s fun to distress with antiquing wax.

NOTE:  When using wax, you cannot seal it with poly after.  The poly does not work well on top of wax.  Remember the alphabet.  W is after P.  If you choose, you can apply a coat of wax over the poly.  Some people like to do that as wax helps repel dust.  But that is just a personal preference.  Poly is fine all by itself.