Decoupage Napkins in a Faux Galvanized Tin Holder

Here are the steps I took to create the coasters:

1. I purchased these stone tiles as part of a package at Home Depot. I cleaned the them thoroughly.

2. I usually paint the tops and sides with our Missouri Limestone Paint Company chalk-style paint in “January” as white paint will really help the print stand out. But these coasters were already white on one side so I skipped this step.

3. I chose areas of the napkin that would look good centered on the tiles and cut them a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part. Sometimes napkins will only have one white layer.

4. For the decoupage medium, I used Mod Podge on this set. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a piece of plastic wrap to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.this plastic wrap helps to keep the napkin from sticking to my fingers.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

I used a painting technique to create a faux galvanized tin look to a plain black coaster holder.

You can see how I did this technique in another blog post, found here.

I enjoyed doing this technique so much I have used it on a variety of items.

A Black and White Coffee Bar Sign

I created this fun coffee bar sign. It was easy and turned out great!

I started with an 11×14” thin canvas board from Dollar Tree and a package of Priss wall stickers from Dollar General. I used Mod Podge to glue them down and Varathane water-based polyurethane satin finish to seal them.

I laid out the words in a design I liked and then took the backing off the first one to apply. I saw right away the adhesive wasn’t sticking well to the canvas board so I made the decision to use Mod Podge to glue each one down.

Once they were all down and sealed well l gave them another coat of Mod a Podge.

I will usually use a hair dryer to help the dry time and use my fingers to press down to help alleviate any lifting or bubbles.

I didn’t care for the gloss of the Mod Podge so I used the Varathane satin finish polyurethane to seal and gave it two thin coats. I like to use a damp car sponge to apply polyurethane. It now had a nice matte finish.

I thought a black frame would set it off. I didn’t want to go to Dollar Tree so I started searching for an 11×14” frame I might have. Score! I found a frame and it is vintage! I know it is vintage because it held my husband’s 1971 college diploma. Lol! Not anymore!

I kept the glass in as it will help with durability.

And there you have it! An adorable black and white 11×14” coffee bar sign. Wouldn’t it look great paired with a set of Rae Dunn coffee mugs?

A Faux Succulent on a Can of Vegetables Decoupaged With a Napkin

How pretty, right? You would never know that’s a can of garbanzo beans under there. 😁

I woke up this morning thinking I wanted to napkin decoupage a tin can and add a succulent to it. I had all the supplies except for the tin can. I did have a can of garbanzo beans, though. I didn’t want to waste food, so I decided to just decoupage the full can. I could always just open up the can later. I did realize, too late, that I shouldn’t paint the lid in case I do want to eat the beans. So I would not paint the lid the next time.

I gathered my supplies and got started.

I didn’t use the refried beans. That is there just to show you what a can of vegetables looks like with its clothes on compared to when it is naked. ☺️

Step 1:

I then painted the can, but next time I won’t, just in case I want to open the can later. I used two light coats of “Grannie’s Lace” from our brand of chalk-style paint Missouri Limestone Paint Company. It really doesn’t matter what paint you use. The can also doesn’t need full coverage. The napkin details will show better just by it being white.

Step 2:

The expiration date was already on the bottom of this can. I just added the name in case I forgot what was in there.

Step 3:

I trimmed the napkin to fit the can, leaving a little overlap on the top and sides. Also with napkins you need to pull apart and remove extra layers as you can see in the above photo.

Step 4:

I was now ready to decoupage. I spread a thick layer of Mod Podge onto the can. I cut down a small baggie and tape it small enough to slip my fingers into it like a mitten. I use the plastic to press the napkin into the Mod Podge. This keeps the napkin from tearing as it will stick to your fingers otherwise. Any little bit of plastic will work. You still must press carefully.

Step 5:

After decoupage dried, I sanded the rim of the top. The part sticking up will sand right off, leaving a clean edge. I then added another coat of Mod Podge all over to seal it.

Step 6: Final Step. I just added a little Spanish Moss and a Faux Succulent to the top. You could use a spot of hot glue to hold it in place, but I didn’t. After all, I may just want to open up that can of garbanzo beans. The moss and succulent will be easy to remove. ☺️

Upcycle a Stone Coaster with a Decoupaged Napkin

I ran across a set of four stone coasters in a thrift store one day. Someone had tried to stencil and had a fail with bleed through. Their loss was my gain so I bought them with the idea I could do something with them some day.

Update: these coasters were already made but a friend told me she gets the stone tile at Lowes and then adds felt pads to the bottom for coasters. 🙂

Today is that day. We are going to deliver this beautiful bistro set to its new owner this weekend (hopefully the snow stops soon), but we wrapped and loaded it before the snow started in case we can’t go until Sunday.

This is a repeat client and I wanted to have a little gift for her. As I am such a hoarder….I mean a person who is always prepared …… with supplies, I just happened to also have a package of napkins I purchased in a shop somewhere that I knew would look great with the color of paint I used, Missouri Limestone Paint Company Chalk-style paint “Clothesline”, one of my favorite colors.

Here are the steps I took to create two coasters for her that will look great on the stained table top. Sorry, I forgot to take pics of this part.

1. I cleaned the coasters thoroughly.

2. I painted the tops and sides (to cover the black stencil) white “January” color. The white paint will really help the print stand out.

3. While the paint dried, I cut out the flower area a little bigger than the coaster. I peeled off the two white layers of the napkin so that I was left with only the printed part.

4. For the decoupage medium, I did not use Modpodge. I used Varathane water-based Polyurethane. I find it works great for decoupage. I applied a layer over the white paint and while still wet I applied the napkin. I used a sponge dipped in the poly to press the napkin into the stone, making sure I had no bubbles.

5. Once dry, I used 220 sandpaper to sand the edges.

6. I then used 2 coats of Rustoleum spray lacquer on the tops and sides to seal the napkin. Using lacquer will not reactivate the poly, so no bubbles formed.

The coasters look beautiful! I think my client will be very happy with her gift.